Vanderbilt University
Institute of Imaging Science
VUIIS Logo
Friday
31
January
2003
1:00pm
Seong-Gi Kim, PhD
High Resolution fMRI at High Magnetic Fields
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
28
March
2003
1:00pm
Michael Welch, PhD
Washington University
Advances in PET Imaging: From Mouse to Man
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
April
2003
1:00pm
Rod Pettigrew, MD, PhD
Director, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
May
2003
1:00pm
Robert Gillies, PhD
University of Arizona
Causes and Consequences of the Hostile Tumor Microenvironment
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
02
March
2004
1:00pm
Richard Hargreaves, PhD
Merck, Inc
Imaging in Neuroscience Drug Discovery and Development
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
March
2004
1:00pm
Carl Jaffe
National Cancer Institute
Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Drug Trials
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
April
2004
1:00pm
Jeff Alger, PhD
Diffusion and Perfusion MRI Studies of Human Stroke
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
07
May
2004
1:00pm
Sharmila Majumdar, PhD
University of California, San Francisco
Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Articular Cartilage and Bone
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
February
2005
1:00pm
Peter Burns, PhD
University of Toronto
Imaging Angiogenesis with Ultrasound and Microbubbles
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
29
April
2005
1:00pm
David Piwnica-Worms, MD, PhD
Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO
Imaging Signal Transduction and Protein-Protein Interactions In Vivo with Genetically Encoded Reporters
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
September
2005
1:00pm
Felix Wehrli, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Structural NMR Imaging: from Submillimeter to Micrometer Resolution
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
February
2006
1:00pm
Jeffrey Evelhoch, PhD
Director of Imaging in the Medical Science Department Amgen, Inc.
Imaging as a Biomarker for Development of Human Therapeutics
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
31
March
2006
1:00pm
Zaver Bhujawaller, PhD
Johns Hopkins University
MR Molecular and Functional Imaging of Cancer
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
September
2006
1:00pm
Barry Horwitz, PhD
National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, NIH
Using Neural Modeling and Functional Neuroimaging to Study the Neural Basis of Auditory and Visual Object Processing
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
October
2006
1:00pm
Bruce J. Tromberg, PhD
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California
Medical Imaging in Thick Tissues Using Diffuse Optics
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
December
2006
1:00pm
Keith D. Paulsen
Thayer School of Engineering Dartmouth College
Imaging the Breast with Alternatives to Standard Practice
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
19
January
2007
1:00pm
Robert L. Sah, MD, ScD
University of California, San Diego
Bioengineering Articular Cartilage and Synovial Joints   (more ...)
Bioengineering Articular Cartilage and Synovial Joints   (hide ...)

The synovial joint is the most common type of joint in the body. Such a joint consists of a synovium-lined cavity containing synovial fluid that separates articulating cartilage-covered bones. Often, such joints are functional for a lifetime, with the synovial fluid-bathed articular cartilage providing surfaces that are low-friction, wear-resistant, and load-bearing. In adults, damaged articular cartilage does not heal effectively after injury, and a common aging-associated malady is osteoarthritis with progressive cartilage deterioration.
The synovial fluid has high concentrations of lubricant molecules, facilitating low friction and low wear of articular cartilage. Boundary-mode friction tests and accelerated wear tests of articulating cartilage surfaces demonstrate these roles for synovial fluid. Lubricant molecule components of synovial fluid that lower friction in the boundary mode are proteoglycan-4 and hyaluronan. Such lubricant molecules can be synthesized by cartilage and synovium.
One structural feature of articular cartilage is the location and organization of the indwelling chondrocytes. Chondrocytes are present at a density that decreases with depth from the articular surface. The density of chondrocytes also decreases with normal aging. In osteoarthritis, brood clones can lead to a normalization of cell density, although the organization of cells within cartilage may remain deranged. Such cellular features of cartilage can be delineated by 3-D histological methods.
To fabricate and maintain whole biological joints ex vivo, an appropriate interaction of cartilage, synovium, and synovial fluid components appears critical. Mechanobiological effects and interactions in joints normally result in a high concentration of lubricant molecules, while providing for nutrient exchange. Dynamic compressive and shear loads applied to cartilage stimulate secretion of load-bearing matrix and friction-lowering lubricant, respectively. An inter-compartmental model highlights such interactions and can be used to select component parameters for testing fabricated joints ex vivo. A joint-scale bioreactor has been developed and shows the ability to maintain whole joints with viable articular cartilage that is responsive to its mechanical environment.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
03
May
2007
1:00pm
Harvey R. Herschman, PhD
University of California, Los Angeles
Non-invasive imaging of tumor progression, targeting, and therapy
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
April
2008
1:00pm
Tuan Vo-Dinh, PhD
Duke University
Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: Challenges and Potential at the Frontiers of Biomedical Photonics   (more ...)
Nanosensors and Nanoprobes: Challenges and Potential at the Frontiers of Biomedical Photonics   (hide ...)

This lecture presents an overview of recent advances in the development of nanosensors and nanoprobes at the nexus of biology, medicine and nanotechnology. This presentation describes two areas of research related to the development of nanoprobes and nanosensors for single-cell analysis and imaging: (1) plasmonics â??molecular sentinelâ? nanoprobes using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, and (2) nanosensors for in vivo analysis of a single cell for molecular diagnostics and imaging, and ultra-high throughput screening. A new generation of nanosensors and nanoprobes combining bio-recognition and nanotechnology has been developed for in vivo monitoring of biochemical processes in a single living cell. This technique could provide unprecedented insights into intact cell function, allowing, for the first time, studies of molecular functions in the context of the functional cell architecture in an integrated system approach. These studies demonstrate the first applications of plasmonics â??molecular sentinelâ? nanoprobes for diagnostics of diseases such as HIV, and cancer; and the use of nano-biosensors for measurements of molecular signaling pathways inside a single cell. These nanodevices could also be used to develop advanced biosensing and bioimaging systems in order to study in situ intracellular signaling processes and to study gene expression and molecular processes inside individual living cells. Such nanoprobes open new horizons to a host of applications in molecular imaging, biology research, medical diagnostics, ultra-high throughput screening, and investigations of the therapeutic action of pharmaceutical agents.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
30
May
2008
1:00pm
John Boone, PhD
University of California, Davis
Breast Computed Tomography as a Platform for Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
September
2008
1:00pm
Martin G. Pomper, MD, PhD
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Translational Molecular Imaging   (more ...)
Translational Molecular Imaging   (hide ...)

Although most clinical diagnostic imaging studies employ anatomic techniques such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, much of radiology research currently focuses on adapting these conventional methods to physiologic imaging as well as on introducing new techniques and probes for studying processes at the cellular and molecular levels in vivo, i.e. molecular imaging. Molecular imaging promises to provide new methods for the early detection of disease and support for personalized therapy. Although molecular imaging has been practiced in various incarnations for over 20 years in the context of nuclear medicine, other imaging modalities have only recently been applied to the noninvasive assessment of physiology and molecular events. Nevertheless, there has been sufficient experience with specifically targeted contrast agents and high-resolution techniques for MR imaging and other modalities that we must begin moving these new technologies from the laboratory to the clinic. This brief overview will outline molecular imaging from probe development to clinical translation, with a focus on translational (small animal) and early clinical imaging. We will discuss the ability for molecular imaging to assess specific signal transduction cascades, which are increasingly the targets of newer, cytostatic therapeutic agents, and provide examples of how existing or readily accessible molecular tracers and techniques can provide insight into rather complex biological phenomena in vivo.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
October
2008
1:00pm
Bruce R. Rosen, MD, PhD

Harvard Medical School,
Director, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital

Multimodal Neuroimaging of the Brain   (more ...)
Multimodal Neuroimaging of the Brain   (hide ...)

The last decade has brought revolutionary new techniques allowing visualization of the working brain in humans at the systems level. However, a large gap remains between the spatiotemporal resolution of todayâ??s tomographic techniques (e.g. fMRI), and methods to address underlying electrophysiologic and neurochemical actions required for a more complete understanding of brain function. This talk will discuss several key neuroimaging technologies to help bridge this critical gap. New methods are being developed to allow the direct visualization of animal and human neural systems organization from the systems level to the columnar level (<100 micron), with temporal resolution from hundreds down to milliseconds. Four key technologies will be discussed: (1) extremely high resolution MRI and fMRI, using very high strength gradients, phased-array coils, and other advances at 3T and 7T; (2) Combined PET/MRI imaging, for simultaneous mapping of cerebral physiology and neurochemistry (3) tomographic optical imaging, increasing the resolution and physiological range in vivo using diffuse optical tomography; and (4) high resolution EEG/MEG arrays, and associated analytic and modeling approaches to integrate these data with other methods. Each of these technologies is designed to allow us to explore another dimension in the three dimensional space of â??whereâ?, â??whatâ? and â??whenâ? regarding brain function, and explore spatiotemporal and neurochemical domains that have not heretofore been addressable non-invasively.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
March
2009
1:00pm
Terry Peters, PhD
Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario
Virtual Reality Assisted Therapy of the Brain and Heart   (more ...)
Virtual Reality Assisted Therapy of the Brain and Heart   (hide ...)

Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. We have developed techniques for performing minimally-invasive surgery on the brain and heart that rely on pre-operative images, combined with data acquired during the procedure. This presentation will illustrate this work with respect to its application for both deep-brain stimulator implantation as well as intra-cardiac therapy. For deep-brain therapy for Parkinson's tremor, we map a database of deep-brain electrophysiological responses to the patient's brain. Guided by these data and intra-operatively acquired electrophysiology measurements, the target region is approached with a stimulating electrode through a small burr-hole in the skull to select the final target. In the heart, many intra-cardiac interventions are currently performed after the chest has been opened, the patient placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, and the heart arrested. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
12
March
2010
1:00pm
Richard L. Ehman
Mayo Clinci
Magnetic Resonance Elastography: A New Touch in Medical Imaging
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
21
May
2010
1:00pm
Paul A. Dayton
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering
Advances in Technology for Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
02
September
2010
12:00pm
Ed Donnelly
Vanderbilt University
Clinical Cancer Imaging Overview
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
10
September
2010
1:00pm
Charles Manning
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Molecular Probes for Cancer Imaging: Discovery and Validation   (more ...)
Molecular Probes for Cancer Imaging: Discovery and Validation   (hide ...)

The introduction of molecularly targeted therapies to treat cancer has underscored a critical need to develop and validate highly specific and robust biomarkers to predict patients likely to benefit from these interventions and to quantitatively assay their clinical and biological activity. Conventional biomarkers typically require invasive procurement of limited amounts of tissue with attendant risks and sampling errors due to heterogeneity. For this reason, noninvasive imaging methods capable of profiling tumors at the molecular level are eminently attractive. Major challenges within the field of translational molecular imaging include the discovery and development of novel probes and their rigorous validation within relevant biological contexts.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
16
September
2010
12:00pm
Joe Roland
Vanderbilt University
The Epithelial Biology Center Imaging Resource
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Jessica Clark
Vanderbilt University
Pediatric Radiation Doses from CT Studies
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
17
September
2010
1:00pm
Melissa Skala
Vanderbilt University Biomedical Engineering
Multi-Functional Optical Imaging of Cancer in Pre-Clinical Models   (more ...)
Multi-Functional Optical Imaging of Cancer in Pre-Clinical Models   (hide ...)

Optical techniques are attractive for monitoring disease processes in living tissues because they are relatively cheap, non-invasive and provide a wealth of functional information. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) are two types of three-dimensional optical imaging modalities that have demonstrated great utility in pre-clinical models of disease. My research has leveraged these techniques to study (1) metabolic, (2) vascular and (3) molecular biomarkers in cancer. These biomarkers can be used to identify the mechanisms of tumor growth, and to predict the response of a particular tumor to treatment. Specifically, MPM of the co-enzymes NADH and FAD was used to quantify metabolic changes associated with early cancers in animal models. Vascular imaging was achieved with a combined spectral / OCT microscope that quantifies microvessel blood oxygenation, morphology and blood flow velocity in tumors. Both of these technologies exploit intrinsic sources of tissue contrast and thus do not require contrast agents. Ongoing work combines these metabolic (MPM) and vascular (spectral / OCT) imaging techniques to provide a complete picture of oxygen supply and demand in response to tumor therapy. Molecular signaling represents a third critical component in tumor physiology. To this end we have recently developed photothermal OCT, which combines coherent detection with laser-heated gold nanoparticles to achieve high-resolution molecular contrast at deeper depths than MPM. This multi-functional imaging platform will provide unprecedented insight into oxygen supply and demand, and molecular signaling in response to tumor therapies in animal models.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
September
2010
1:00pm
Jianhui Zhong
University of Rochester Medical Center
Longitudinal DTI Studies: Approaches and Challenges   (more ...)
Longitudinal DTI Studies: Approaches and Challenges   (hide ...)

This presentation will present on preliminary results in analyzing longitudinal results from mild traumatic brain injury and other brain abnormalities usin DTI.
Focus will be on the current issues and challenges and audience input will be appreciated.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
30
September
2010
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Rob Barry
Vanderbilt University
Review of Functional Neuroimaging of Chemotherapy-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction ("Chemobrain")
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Michelle Beckler
Vanderbilt University
EGFR ligands in exosomes
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
October
2010
1:00pm
Lori Arlinghaus
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Translating quantitative MR techniques from the brain to the breast   (more ...)
Translating quantitative MR techniques from the brain to the breast   (hide ...)

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among American women. Currently, tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is monitored by frank changes in tumor morphology, such as size as measured by physical exam, mammography, and/or ultrasound. However, it may take weeks to months before measureable changes occur in response to successful treatment. Several quantitative magnetic resonance imaging methods typically used in neuroimaging applications have the potential to be sensitive to changes in tumors that occur on the cellular level prior to gross morphological changes, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), magnetization transfer (MT), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST), and high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) imaging. I will discuss the current status of the development and application of these methods for assessment of treatment response in breast cancer at 3T.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
04
October
2010
1:00pm
Bennett Landman
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
The Quality Assurance Conundrum with Diffusion Weighted Imaging: Noise, Distortion and (eventually) Signal
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
08
October
2010
1:00pm
Greg Karczmar
University of Chicago
Detection of early breast cancers with MRI
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
11
October
2010
1:00pm
Calum Avison
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Dopamine, insulin signaling and obesity - how the fast food industry hijacks your brain
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
12
October
2010
12:00pm
Mike Olive
Vanderbilt University
Improving the Surgical Treatment of Cancer with Optical Imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
14
October
2010
12:00pm
Dave Smith
Vanderbilt University
Improving Cancer Imaging with Compressed Sensing MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Raul Colon
Vanderbilt University
Kinetics of Para/orthohydrogen Conversion for Hyperpolarized MR Applications
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
15
October
2010
1:00pm
Ha-Kyu Jeong
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
High resolution diffusion-weighted imaging at 7T
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
18
October
2010
1:00pm
Aize Cao
Carissa Cascio
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Reducing head movement during fMRI using real-time feedback training in the mock scanner
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
22
October
2010
1:00pm
Armando Manduca
Mayo Clinic
Nonconvex Compressive Sensing Methods for Highly Accelerated 4D MRA   (more ...)
Nonconvex Compressive Sensing Methods for Highly Accelerated 4D MRA   (hide ...)

Compressed or compressive sensing (CS) is a novel signal processing theory that asserts that the number of samples required to reconstruct an image accurately is related to the information content in the image. CS has been gaining significant attention in medical imaging in general and MRI in particular since it offers the promise of accurate image reconstruction from highly undersampled data. This leads to reduced acquisition times (and potentially reduced radiation dose in CT), or this benefit can be traded off for higher spatial and temporal resolution or higher image quality. However, there are significant limitations to current CS approaches in MRI, including long computation times, and relatively few successful applications have been reported to date. Many current MR techniques, particularly MR angiography (MRA) and MR perfusion imaging, are limited by low spatial and/or temporal resolution and low SNR. Recent developments in highly undersampled MRI acquisition strategies and in compressive sensing reconstruction algorithms, when applied to 3D contrast enhanced MRA exams, have improved the combined spatial and temporal resolution of such exams by 10X, improved the visualization of vessels and increased SNR, and dramatically improved the depiction of perfused regions. A computational framework has also been developed that can reconstruct such data in clinically reasonable times. This talk will give an overview of CS in general and the nonconvex CS paradigm that we favor in particular, describe the MRA results above as well as related work on low contrast detectability, and discuss some directions for future research.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
25
October
2010
1:00pm
Mariam Eapen
Elizabeth Stringer
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
7T Series: High spatial resolution fMRI
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
28
October
2010
12:00pm
Adam Smith
Vanderbilt University
Effect of BRAF inhibition on thymidine kinase regulation: implications for FLT uptake
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Natanael Semmineh
Vanderbilt University
Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of DSC-MRI Signal Behavior in Magnetically Inhomogeneous Media
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
29
October
2010
1:00pm
Sam Nolting
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Noninvasive In Vivo Detection of MMP Activity using Novel Proteolytic Solubility-Switch SPECT Probes   (more ...)
Noninvasive In Vivo Detection of MMP Activity using Novel Proteolytic Solubility-Switch SPECT Probes   (hide ...)

Matrix metalloproteinsases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular proteinases, many of which are implicated in tumor progression. These studies focus upon quantifying MMP activity in vivo by SPECT imaging to test the utility of imaging MMP activity as a reporter of tumor status and therapy response. SPECT probes (PBM7rad and PBM9rad) were designed using principles found successful in recently-developed proteolysis-activated solubility-switchable MRI probes. In these probes, an MMP substrate peptide is linked to domains of differing solubility and modified to bind 99mTc(CO)3+, 68Ga3+ or 111In3+. Upon cleavage in the tumor environment, the radiolabeled domain is designed to accumulate at the tumor site. In vitro pilot studies show successful binding of 99mTc(CO)3+ by PBM7rad and stability to competing chelates such as L-histidine. 99mTc-PBM7rad is tolerated in C57Bl6 mice, but demonstrates unfavorable biodistribution in these mice. Current work with PBM9rad aims to increase the solubility of the probe and improve its pharmacokinetics. In future studies, the MMP selectivity of an optimized probe will be assessed in xenograft studies and its sensitivity will be explored using spontaneous cancer models in mice. Ultimately, the SPECT probe will be tested for assessment of tumor response to therapy. The PBM#rad series of probes is designed to image cancer early in its progression and detect subtle changes in the microenvironment of tumors, providing an early metric with potential for predicting therapeutic response.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
01
November
2010
1:00pm
Allen Newton
Jascha Swisher
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
7T Series: Pulse sequences for fMRI
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
05
November
2010
1:00pm
Reed Thompson
Vanderbilt University Neurosurgery
Neurosurgery: imagining the Future
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
08
November
2010
1:00pm
Limin Chen
Arabinda Mishra
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
7T Series: Functional connectivity at high spatial resolution
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
11
November
2010
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Nkiruka Atuegwu
Vanderbilt University
Proliferation values from DW-MRI for predicting tumor growth
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Jason Buck
Vanderbilt University
Targeted TSPO Probes for Cancer Imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
12
November
2010
1:00pm
Bruce Damon
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Professional Expectations of Individuals in the Academic Environment
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
15
November
2010
1:00pm
Pierre-Louis Bazin
John Hopkins University
Brain Image Segmentation with Statistical and Topological Constraints on Anatomy
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
19
November
2010
1:00pm
John Oshinski
Emory School of Medicine
Georgia Insititute of Technology
Can MRI Play a Role in Patient Selection for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy?   (more ...)
Can MRI Play a Role in Patient Selection for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy?   (hide ...)

Using current patient selection criteria (NYHA class III/IV heart failure, LVEF <35%, QRS duration >120 ms, optimal medical therapy for >1 month), >30% of patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with a biventricular pacemaker do not respond positively to the treatment. The high non-response rate to CRT as well as the high cost of the treatment has motivated investigators to seek new imaging methods to better identify patients who will respond to CRT. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is the only non-invasive modality that can determine the three factors most often associated with response to CRT: the presence of mechanical dyssynchrony in the ventricle, the amount and location of myocardial scar, and the anatomy of the coronary venous structures. Combing an imaging assessment of all of the factors could better select patients who will positively respond to CRT, help with understanding the relationship of the factors that effect response to CRT, and elucidate the underlying electro-mechanical coupling involved in determining patient response to CRT.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
02
December
2010
12:00pm
Xia (Lisa) Li
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative assessment of tumor treatment response in human breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Diana Smith
Vanderbilt University
NMR Polarization Transfer Experiments using INEPT and Imaging Applications
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
December
2010
1:00pm
Laurie Cutting
Vanderbilt University Kennedy Center
Neurobiological Effects of Different Training Approaches on Word Learning
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
06
December
2010
1:00pm
Neil Woodward
Vanderbilt University
Resting-State Connectivity Disturbances in Schizophrenia
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
10
December
2010
1:00pm
Manus Donahue
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Understanding brain function in health and disease through development and application of new functional MRI approaches   (more ...)
Understanding brain function in health and disease through development and application of new functional MRI approaches   (hide ...)

Functional MRI is commonly performed using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) approach, which is sensitive to ensemble hemodynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). Understanding how these parameters adjust during and following neuronal activity is important for understanding the BOLD contrast mechanism, and also for probing disease mechanisms where cerebrovascular reactivity may be impaired. I will present work showing how hemodynamics can be investigated using new, noninvasive CBF-weighted arterial spin labelling (ASL) and CBV-weighted vascular-space-occupancy (VASO) approaches. Current knowledge regarding the contrast mechanisms of these approaches will be presented, followed by an overview of applications of these techniques to mechanistic neurovascular coupling, tumor grading, and ischemic cerebrovascular disease studies.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
07
January
2011
1:00pm
William Grissom
GE Global Research, Munich, Germany
Monitoring Temperature in Moving Organs using MRI   (more ...)
Monitoring Temperature in Moving Organs using MRI   (hide ...)

Magnetic resonance thermometry using the proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift is a promising technique for guiding thermal ablation using lasers, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and RF current. The calculation of temperature rises using the PRF-shift technique involves the subtraction of a phase image acquired prior to heating (a baseline image), from a phase image acquired during heating (a treatment image). While this technique works well in stationary organs, the motion of organs such as the liver and the heart causes misalignment between the baseline and treatment images which must be addressed. In this talk, two novel approaches to overcoming motion in PRF-shift thermometry will be presented. The first is a referenceless method based on robust regression that does not require a baseline phase image, and is well-suited for larger organs such as the liver. We also present a hybrid multi-baseline and referenceless method that uses a library of baseline images acquired across the organ's cycle of motion, and is capable of accurately estimating temperature changes in the presence of rapid anatomical phase variations and smooth dynamic main field changes caused by respiration and heart motion. The methods will be demonstrated in the liver, heart, and brain.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
14
January
2011
1:00pm
Brian Welch
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Body Composition Imaging   (more ...)
Body Composition Imaging   (hide ...)

Obesity is an epidemic affecting 70 million people in the United States and over 300 million worldwide. Health consequences of obesity include elevated risk for hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, gallbladder disease, musculoskeletal disorders and several types of cancer. However, not all types of adiposity confer equivalent risk. Mounting evidence indicates relationships among genotype, ethnicity, body composition and cardiometabolic risk. To advance investigations of obesity, clinicians and researchers require methods to characterize body composition to assess the amount, type (subcutaneous or visceral) and distribution of adipose tissue. Imaging methods are considered by many to be among the most accurate tools available for measuring adipose tissue in body tissues and organs in clinical research because such methods provide information about the spatial distribution of adipose tissue. In this talk, several non-imaging methods for assessing body composition will be briefly described before focusing on the wide array of biomedical imaging approaches available such as those based on DEXA, CT and MRI. In particular, MRI is a versatile body composition imaging modality with several distinct techniques for separating water and fat such as methods based on T1, in-phase/out-of-phase subtraction, multi-echo analysis and spectroscopy. Recently, multi-echo MR acquisitions have been used to acquire whole-body fat-water scans in a scan time of only several minutes. This talk will conclude with an in-depth discussion of multi-echo MR fat-water imaging methods and a discussion of some recent applications and results using this promising MRI approach.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
20
January
2011
12:00pm
Lori Arlinghaus
Vanderbilt University
Old tricks for a new dog: Translating quantitative MR techniques from imaging of the brain to imaging of the breast at 3T
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Dewei Tang
Vanderbilt University
TSPO related cancer imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
21
January
2011
1:00pm
Bruce Damon
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
NIH 101
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
28
January
2011
1:00pm
David Smith
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Applications of Compressive Sensing MRI   (more ...)
Applications of Compressive Sensing MRI   (hide ...)

The mathematical theory of compressive sensing (CS) works wonderfully on idealized signals, but MRI is far from ideal. Magnetic resonance images are only sometimes compressible, almost never sparse, and always noisy. We have tackled many projects in the last six months to better understand the border between fact and fiction in CS MRI. I will first present a brief introduction to CS MRI. Then I will present some of the results from our CS MRI projects, including CS DCE MRI, CS DSC MRI, high-SNR spinal cord imaging, CS upsampling, phase smoothing, regularized CS SENSE reconstruction, acquisition robustness, and Adaptive Acquisition. Most of these projects will showcase results from our in house CS algorithms, implemented on our custom, state-of-the-art GPU-based reconstructor and crunching actual scanner data.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
31
January
2011
1:00pm
Stephen Bruehl
Vanderbilt University
Pain, Anger, and Endogenous Opioid Mechanisms
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
03
February
2011
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Desmond Campbell
Vanderbilt University
Advancing Nuclear Breast Imaging with High Purity Germanium Detectors
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Eliot McKinley
Vanderbilt University
High Throughput Screening for TSPO Ligand Discovery
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
04
February
2011
1:00pm
Ash Jayagopal
Vanderbilt Dept. of Chemistry
Nanoscale Probes for Optical Imaging of RNA in Disease
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
11
February
2011
1:00pm
Anuj Srivastava
Florida State University
Statistical Shape Analysis of Parametrized Curves and Surfaces With Applications to Anatomical Objects
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
February
2011
1:00pm
Baxter Rogers
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Functional Connectivity Profile of the Human Hippocampus
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
17
February
2011
12:00pm
Matthew Hight
Vanderbilt University
Microfluidic Production of Novel 18F labeled TSPO Binding Ligands
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Lindsay Johnson
Vanderbilt University
A Radiation Dose-Based Comparison of PET and SPECT for Imaging Bone Metastases
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
18
February
2011
1:00pm
Nellie Byun
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Detection of M4 Muscarinic Cholinergic Regulation of Dopamine with Pharmacologic MRI: Evaluating a Novel Antipsychotic Target   (more ...)
Detection of M4 Muscarinic Cholinergic Regulation of Dopamine with Pharmacologic MRI: Evaluating a Novel Antipsychotic Target   (hide ...)

Pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) is a functional MRI application used to detect specific brain activation patterns and regional pharmacokinetics of psychoactive compounds. The administration of amphetamine, which increases synaptic dopamine levels that lead to activation of specific brain regions detectable by phMRI, can cause psychosis in healthy subjects and exacerbate symptoms in schizophrenia patients. In rodent models, acute amphetamine administration is used to model the positive symptoms of schizophrenia (psychosis). Also in line with the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia, all current antipsychotic drugs target the D2 dopamine receptor. However, the major side effects of current schizophrenia treatments beg for the development of new therapies with different mechanisms of action. Another way to regulate dopamine is through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Until recently, there have been no compounds that selectively target only one of the five muscarinic receptors. The development of VU0152100 by the Conn and Jones laboratories, a compound that selectively targets the M4 muscarinic receptor and crosses the blood brain barrier, has given us an unprecedented tool to study the role of M4 in the brain and evaluate a putative novel antipsychotic compound. Our studies in the acute amphetamine rat model predictive of schizophrenia using contrast-enhanced cerebral blood volume (CBV) phMRI show that pretreatment with the M4 potentiator VU0152100 regulates dopamine output, which is corroborated by behavioral studies.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
February
2011
1:00pm
Roman Shchepin
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Synthesis of Hyperpolarized Tracers for RealTime Metabolic MRI of Breast Cancer
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
28
February
2011
1:00pm
Francesca Bagnato
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
03
March
2011
12:00pm
Gennifer Goode
Vanderbilt University
Knockdown of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Altered Tumorigenic Properties of Human Breast Carcinoma Cell Lines
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Jennifer Whisnant
Vanderbilt University
Functional and Molecular Imaging of Treatment Response in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
04
March
2011
1:00pm
John Gore
VUIIS
Bogus Science   (more ...)
Bogus Science   (hide ...)

A brief overview of different kinds of Bogus Science, especially as it pertains to imaging and academic research. Dr. Gore teaches a Freshman Writing Seminar on this topic and will share some of the content and aims of that course. Its description in the Course Catalog says: "we will study some recent and notorious examples of bad science--cases involving deliberate fraud by scientists as well as examples of claims and reports by well-meaning individuals that have turned out to be bogus. The pursuit of science is supposed to include various safeguards to test the validity of new knowledge and discoveries, such as peer review of publications, testing whether results can be reproduced, and application of "the scientific method." But there have been many notorious examples of deliberate fraud by scientists including the successful publication of claims that have subsequently been shown to be false, and sometimes ridiculous. This course will examine some of the more illustrative cases of deliberate fraud and bad science that have been uncovered and the motives behind their perpetrators. Many such cases reveal defects in the manner in which science and academic matters are reviewed, while others demonstrate how the media and the public can be manipulated by unscrupulous charlatans. In reviewing these cases we will try to examine how science is supposed to operate to avoid these lapses and why bogus science succeeds"
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
07
March
2011
1:00pm
No Meeting - Spring Break
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
11
March
2011
1:00pm
No Seminar - Spring Break
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
18
March
2011
1:00pm
Seth Smith
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
The fewer the facts, the stonger the opinion - Arnold Glasgow. Why go small in MRI?
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
21
March
2011
1:00pm
James Blair
Vanderbilt University
PAICOD STUDY - Peri-Anesthetic Imaging of Cognitive Decline. Imaging What and How?
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
23
March
2011
12:00pm
Emily Hewett
PerkinElmer Inc.

Interrogating a Broad Range of Oncology Biomarkers using Novel In Vivo Imaging Agents
Note: Time Change - 2-3pm, AA-1119

cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
24
March
2011
12:00pm
Richard Baheza
Vanderbilt University
Breast microcalcification detection using MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Jack Virostko
Vanderbilt University
Optical Imaging of Radionuclides
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
25
March
2011
1:00pm
Mark Does
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Probing white matter microstructure with MRI   (more ...)
Probing white matter microstructure with MRI   (hide ...)

Differences in water proton concentration and relaxation rates provide excellent MRI contrast between white and grey matter, but MRI also offers the potential to look beyond inter-voxel contrast to the sub-voxel scale. At the spatial scale of micrometers, white matter is heterogeneous, comprised of myelinated axons of varied size and geometric orientation. Different MRI methods are used to interrogate this sub-voxel information: diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT), and multi-exponential transverse relaxation analysis (MET2), but a comprehensive model relating these measures to each other and to white matter micro-anatomy has remained elusive. Our recent studies have cast new light on this picture, revealing the role of myelin thickness in MET2 and identifying both T2 and MT characteristics for methylene membran! e protons. This talk will discuss these experimental studies and their relevance to characterizing white matter microstructure with MRI.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
28
March
2011
1:00pm
Uma Rao
Meharry Medical College
Reward Systems and Decision-making in Adolescents
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
01
April
2011
1:00pm
Nkiruka Atuegwu
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science

Incorporation of DW-MRI Data into a Simple Model of Tumor Growth: Preliminary Results

   (more ...)

Incorporation of DW-MRI Data into a Simple Model of Tumor Growth: Preliminary Results

   (hide ...)

The impact of mathematical models on predicting tumor growth can be enhanced with the addition of imaging data because parameters available from imaging can be obtained noninvasively, in 3D, longitudinally, and specifically for each patient. The predictions made from mathematical models parameterized by imaging data are patient specific and can readily be checked against actual measurements obtained at later time points. We show how a simple mathematical model of tumor growth can be parameterized by values obtained from sequential diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI). DW-MRI data obtained early in the course of therapy was used to estimate tumor proliferation rates, and these rates where then used to predict tumor cellularity at the conclusion of therapy.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
04
April
2011
1:00pm
Tricia Thornton-Wells
Vanderbilt University
The neural basis of heightened empathy in Williams syndrome: an fMRI study of the auditory mirror neuron system
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
07
April
2011
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Stephanie Barnes
Vanderbilt University
Modeling the effect of diffusion on DCE-MRI parameterization
and Investigating imaging biomarkers of treatment response
in a preclincial model of human breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Pierre P. Massion
Vanderbilt University
Glutamine and cholesterol transport as targets for molecular
imaging in lung cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
08
April
2011
1:00pm
Amanda Buck
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Imaging cardiovascular and muscle biomechanics   (more ...)
Imaging cardiovascular and muscle biomechanics   (hide ...)

MR imaging-based biomechanics can be used to non-invasively assess function and to elucidate the relationship between mechanics and disease. This talk will describe projects using MR data 1) to characterize the physiologic flow field in the vertebrobasilar system using computational fluid dynamics (CFD); 2) to study cerebral artery hemodynamics in pediatric sickle cell disease patients using CFD for the long term goal of elucidating the association between hemodynamics and stroke risk; and 3) to determine the relationship between structure and function in the lower extremity muscles in healthy subjects using fiber tracking for the purpose of applying this framework in studies with Becker Muscular Dystrophy patients.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
11
April
2011
1:00pm

Aize Cao
Jenni Blackford

Vanderbilt University
Amygdala volume and shape
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
15
April
2011
1:00pm
Jeffery Ankar
Clemson University
Chemical and biophysical sensing with magnetic and X-ray excited optical luminescence probes   (more ...)
Chemical and biophysical sensing with magnetic and X-ray excited optical luminescence probes   (hide ...)

Fluorescence-based chemical sensing techniques are highly sensitive and versatile, but three principle obstacles limit their use in scattering environments. First, absorbance and scattering attenuates the signal; second, tissue autofluorescence provides spectral interference; third, scattering dramatically reduces the spatial resolution of imaging. We developed two types of probes, Magneticallay modulate optical nanoprobes (MagMOONs) and radioluinescent chemical sensors, to overcome these limitations. MagMOONs are fluorescent microspheres that have been coated with a hemisphereical metal half-shell using vapor deposition. The opaque metal breaks the microsphere's optical symmetry so that it scatters light and fluoresces in an orientation-dependent manner (it looks like a moon with a fluorescent bright side, a metal capped dark side, and a crescent-shape that depends on its orientation). If the microsphere contains magnetic material, it aligns with an external magnetic and will rotate in a rotating magnetic field. As the particle rotates it blinks as it turns through bright and dark orientations. The blinking signal from these MagMOONs can be separated from unmodulated autofluorescence backgrounds allowing detection in fluorescent and turbid environments. The blinking fluorescence spectrum provides a measure of the concentration of chemical analytes that interact with fluorescent dyes within the microspheres. The signal from a few thousand MagMOONs can be detected through at least 9 mm of chicken breast even using green excitation with intense autofluorescence backgrounds. However, the spatial resolution remains limited by optical scattering. In order to localize luminescence from chemical sensors within a tissue, we employ a novel radioluminescent spectrochemical probe. These probes provide high resolution chemical measurements, limited by the width of the X-ray beam because only probes within the beam emit light. These probes have important applications in minimally-invasive chemical and biophysical tissue measurements.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
18
April
2011
1:00pm
Laurie Cutting
Vanderbilt University
Learning and communication
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
21
April
2011
12:00pm
Jacob Fluckiger
Vanderbilt University
Aspects of PET-MRI in breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Samantha Soebbing
Vanderbilt University
Noninvasive In Vivo Detection of MMP Activity using Novel Proteolytic Solubility-Switch SPECT Probes
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
22
April
2011
1:00pm
Bennett Landman
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Capturing Structure in MRI by Working Together: Techniques for Label Fusion
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
25
April
2011
1:00pm
Corinna Haenschel
Vanderbilt University
Schizophrenia
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
29
April
2011
1:00pm
Ted Towse
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
May
2011
1:00pm
Swati Rane
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Cerebral Blood Volume Measurement with functional MRI
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
May
2011
1:00pm
Imam Uddin
Dalhousie University
Design and Synthesis of Receptor-Targeting C-Ring Functionalized Prodigiosenes for the Treatment of Cancers & Utilities of N-Heterocycles in C-C and C-heteroatom Bond-forming Reactions   (more ...)
Design and Synthesis of Receptor-Targeting C-Ring Functionalized Prodigiosenes for the Treatment of Cancers & Utilities of N-Heterocycles in C-C and C-heteroatom Bond-forming Reactions   (hide ...)

Prodigiosin is a naturally occurring red pigment isolated from several Serratia and Streptomyces bacterial strains and is of medicinal interest due to immunosuppressive, antimicrobial and cytotoxic properties. The anti-cancer activity of prodigiosin is thought to be due to a combination of factors: it is an efficient H+/Cl- transporter and it is able to induce copper-mediated double-strand DNA cleavage. However, its high level of toxicity has excluded its use as a therapeutic agent. Thus, numerous investigations have been focused on the structure-activity relationships in prodigiosenes (synthetic analogs of prodigiosin) and their abilities as anti-cancer agents with improved selectivity over existing chemotherapeutic options. Details of the synthesis and biological property of our new prodigiosenes including a novel process involving substituted pyrroles and diprrins will be discussed. A number of green processes involving high-pressure and microwave irradiation for the construction of important carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond forming reactions using different nitrogen-heterocycles will also be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
01
September
2011
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Andrej Lyschik
Vanderbilt University
Clinical Applications of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Zhaozhong Han
Vanderbilt University
Imaging tumors with recombinant peptides
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
02
September
2011
1:00pm
Adam Anderson
Vanderbilt University
MRI Measurements of Structural Connectivity in the Brain
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
09
September
2011
1:00pm
Natalie Han
Vanderbilt University
Effect of Non-Rigid Registration Algorithms on the Analysis of Brain MR Images with Deformation Based Morphometry   (more ...)
Effect of Non-Rigid Registration Algorithms on the Analysis of Brain MR Images with Deformation Based Morphometry   (hide ...)

Deformation Based Morphometry (DBM) is a widely used method for characterizing anatomical differences across populations. DBM is based on the analysis of the deformation fields generated by non-rigid registration algorithms, that warp the individual volumes to a DBM atlas. Although several studies have compared non-rigid registration algorithms for segmentation tasks, few studies have compared the effect of the registration algorithms on group differences that may be uncovered through DBM. The overarching goal of this dissertation is to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the extent to which DBM results are a function of the registration algorithms used to compute the deformation fields. Five well-established non-rigid registration algorithms are compared: (1) The Adaptive Bases Algorithm (ABA); (2) The Image Registration Toolkit (IRTK); (3) The FSL Nonlinear Image Registration Tool (FSL); (4) The Automatic Registration Tool (ART); and (5) the normalization algorithm available in SPM8. These algorithms are tested on two very different real data sets and a series of simulated datasets. The first real data set has large and well-documented anatomical differences between normal subjects and subjects with the Williams Syndrome. The second real data set contains MR images of third-grade children with different levels of mathematical abilities; anatomical differences in his data set are more subtle. Because the lack of ground truths makes it difficult to compare algorithms under controlled conditions, a series of simulated MR images with various known anatomical differences are produced. DBM results obtained with various registration algorithms are compared with the introduced ground truth both qualitatively and quantitatively. The main conclusions that can be drawn from this work is that (1) DBM-based findings are indeed dependent on the registration algorithm that is used and (2) the FWE statistical scheme that is commonly used to multiple comparison correction may be over-conservative. When performing DBM analysis, our suggestions would be to use more than one algorithm and to look for regions that are consistently labeled as statistically significant across these algorithms. DBM results should be interpreted with care and the characteristics of the registration algorithm used need to be taken into consideration in the interpretation process. We are also the first to report that brain anatomy may correlate with the level of mathematical performances in a relatively large population of third graders.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
15
September
2011
12:00pm
Junzhong Xu
Vanderbilt University
MRI Quantification of Tumors by Temporal Diffusion Spectroscopy
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Swati Biswas
Vanderbilt University
Doxorubicin mediated bone loss in murine models of breast cancer to bone metastasis
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
16
September
2011
1:00pm
Elizabeth Maher
UT Southwestern
Imaging in Translational Research of Malignant Gliomas Bridges the Gap Between Basic Investigations and Clinical Management
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
September
2011
1:00pm
Charles Caskey
UC Davis
Emerging technologies in ultrasound imaging, therapeutics, and guided ultrasonic intervention   (more ...)
Emerging technologies in ultrasound imaging, therapeutics, and guided ultrasonic intervention   (hide ...)

While ultrasound (US) is well known for creating real-time 2D maps of anatomy and blood flow, emerging applications have demonstrated many exciting possibilities that will expand the capabilities of ultrasound to include image-guided localized drug and gene delivery, targeted imaging, and generation of local hyperthermia. Successful and safe implementation of these technologies requires development of novel hardware and a multi-disciplinary approach that considers the biological problem being addressed as well as underlying physical mechanisms. In this talk, I will first discuss the development of an open source computed tomography (CT) and US fusion designed to facilitate image-guided application of mild hyperthermia with ultrasound. Our real-time fused CT/US system provides navigational assistance to US for therapeutic intervention, as well as tissue mapping, which is vital for ultrasound thermometry. The CT/US system has accuracy on the order of 1 millimeter and is implemented in an extendable, open-source framework on a C-arm cone-beam CT scanner with a flat panel detector, similar to a new generation of CT scanners available in interventional radiology suites. The second part of the talk will discuss mechanisms for vascular permeability enhancement using micron-sized, lipid-encapsulated contrast agents, called microbubbles. Co-injection of these bubbles with a drug or gene of interest, followed by application of ultrasound has been shown by many researchers to enhance drug delivery and permeability; however, the mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully understood. Here, I will relate images of microbubbles undergoing MHz-scale oscillation to theoretical formulations of microbubble activity to define a parameter space for safe and effective use of microbubbles for drug delivery.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
26
September
2011
1:00pm
Anna Roe
Vanderbilt University
Latest Advances in Nonhuman Primate Neuroimaging
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
29
September
2011
12:00pm
Jack Skinner
Vanderbilt University
Comparison of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI and Quantitative SPECT in a Rat Glioma Model
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
30
September
2011
1:00pm
Marcin Jankiewicz
Vanderbilt University
RF Pulse designs for 7T scanner   (more ...)
RF Pulse designs for 7T scanner   (hide ...)

The goal of the presentation is to review some of the RF strategies for 7 Tesla MRI, developed and investigated by our group at Vanderbilt. The strategies target unwanted RF and static field inhomogeneity patterns that corrupt image quality. The solutions developed by our group include modification and optimization of the scanner’s hardware as well as software. The talk will focus on the latter which demonstrate the capabilities of multi-transmit technology, spectral-spatial excitations and optimized composite pulses.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
03
October
2011
1:00pm
Manus Donahue
Vanderbilt University
New MRI Approaches for Measuring Brain Functions: Applications in Stroke, Dementia, and Cognitive Neuroscience
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
07
October
2011
1:00pm
Todd Peterson
Vanderbilt University
Multi-pinhole SPECT with Semiconductor Detectors   (more ...)
Multi-pinhole SPECT with Semiconductor Detectors   (hide ...)

Improving the utility of small-animal SPECT for molecular imaging studies requires addressing the competing demands for sensitivity and spatial resolution. Our strategy involves combining a novel collimation scheme with semiconductor-based radiation detectors. I will describe the SPECT systems we are developing within the context of competing approaches.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
10
October
2011
1:00pm
Bennett Landman
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Informatice at VUIIS
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
13
October
2011
12:00pm
Desmond Campbell
Vanderbilt University
Evaluating Collimator Designs for Breast Imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Stephanie Barnes
Vanderbilt University
Assessing repeatability in small animal imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
14
October
2011
1:00pm
Bob Galloway
Vanderbilt University
Image-Guided Surgery and Procedures
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
17
October
2011
1:00pm
Hakmook Kang
Vanderbilt University
Spatio-Spectral mixed effects model in fMRI data analysis
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
20
October
2011
12:00pm
Jared Weis
Vanderbilt University

Inverse Biomechanical Analysis and Beyond: From Bone Fracture FEA to Cancer MR Elastography
NOTE: 12-1pm

cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
21
October
2011
1:00pm
Michael Goldfarb
Vanderbilt University
Some Forward-Looking Assistive Devices to Improve Quality of Life for Persons with Physical Disabilities   (more ...)
Some Forward-Looking Assistive Devices to Improve Quality of Life for Persons with Physical Disabilities   (hide ...)

Recent advances in robotics technology have brought to the near horizon some new possibilities with respect to the development of assistive devices for purposes of enhancing the mobility and/or functionality of persons with physical disabilities. This talk will focus on the development of three such assistive devices, which are intended to provide enhanced mobility and/or functionality for persons with lower limb loss, upper limb loss, and with paraplegia, respectively. Specifically, the talk will describe the development of a powered transfemoral prosthesis for lower extremity amputees, the development of a multigrasp hand for upper extremity amputees, and the development of a lower limb exoskeleton for legged mobility assistance in individuals with paraplegia.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
24
October
2011
12:00pm
Gladys Simiyu
East Carolina University
Low-Dose Radiation Enhanced Cell Survival is Associated with G2 Arrest in A375 Human Melanoma Cells
NOTE: Special Time 4pm
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Jascha Droll Swisher
Vanderbilt University
Time-resolved FMRI at 7T
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
27
October
2011
12:00pm
Chris Jarrett
Vanderbilt University
Physical basis of acousto-optical imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Nataenal Semmineh
Vanderbilt University
The Assessment of Tumor Cellularity using DSC-MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
28
October
2011
1:00pm
Bruce Damon
Vanderbilt University
(BOLDly) Imaging Muscle Microvascular Function
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
31
October
2011
1:00pm
Baxter Rogers
Vanderbilt University
Sources of Signal in Functional Connectivity Measurements
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
03
November
2011
12:00pm

Saurav Chandra
NOTE: Special Time 1-2pm, Rm AA1119

University of Florida
Detection and Characterization of Retinal Disruption In Mice
using Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
04
November
2011
1:00pm
Carolyn Lauzon
Vanderbilt University
Improving Statistical Analysis for DTI: Empirical Bias Evaluations and Mutli-Method Comparisons   (more ...)
Improving Statistical Analysis for DTI: Empirical Bias Evaluations and Mutli-Method Comparisons   (hide ...)

Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enables investigation of the cytoarchitectural environment of in vivo tissues through contrasts sensitive to water diffusion barriers at the micrometer level, e.g., axonal membranes. Estimated contrasts (e.g., fractional anisotropy) exhibit both variability and bias relative to the true quantitative contrasts that could be estimated from a hypothetical noise-free acquisition. Much previous work has shown the magnitude and direction of bias is dependent on anatomy, imaging sequence, and noise level. Hence, comparison of DTI contrasts across acquisitions can be statistically troubling, especially for subtle effects. Herein, we present the use of the SIMulation and EXtrapolation (SIMEX) approach for assessment of bias in a massively-univariate imaging setting and evaluate the potential of a SIMEX-based bias correction. Spatially varying FA and MD bias error maps are evaluated on independent and highly differentiated case studies. With this approach, we find significant reductions in contrast bias which could be used to ensure constancy in analyses across diverse DTI scans and suggests increased power and specificity for secondary statistical studies.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
07
November
2011
1:00pm
Jacci Clauss
Vanderbilt University
Anticipation of Social Stimuli in Inhibited Temperament
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
10
November
2011
12:00pm
Lori Arlinghaus
Vanderbilt University
Clinical applications of quantitative MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
David Smith
Vanderbilt University
High resolution breast acquisition strategies using compressive sensing and parallel imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
11
November
2011
1:00pm
Nathan Bryant
Vanderbilt University
Multi-parametric MRI studies of inflammation in murine quadricep muscle   (more ...)
Multi-parametric MRI studies of inflammation in murine quadricep muscle   (hide ...)

Healthy skeletal muscle was compared to inflammation in the contralateral quadriceps muscles of mice. T2, indices of diffusion, quantitative magnetization transfer, and dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE) MRI data were acquired during the same imaging session. The edematous muscle exhibited a significant increase in T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the DCE estimate of the interstitial volume, while a concomitant decrease was observed in the proton pool ratio. The aim of this study is to provide a basis for understanding how inflammation, in isolation from complex pathology, influences the quantitative MRI parameters that are commonly used to characterize muscle disease.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
November
2011
1:00pm
No Meeting
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
18
November
2011
1:00pm
Stephanie Barnes
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
21
November
2011
1:00pm
No Meeting: Happy Thanksgiving!
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
25
November
2011
1:00pm
No Seminar: Happy Thanksgiving!
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
28
November
2011
1:00pm
Carissa Cascio
Vanderbilt University
fMRI Study of Reward in Autism
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
01
December
2011
12:00pm
Post Doctorate Candidate Seminar
Julio Cardenas
University of Arizona
Improving Assessments of Tumor Angiogenesis with New
DCE-MRI Methods
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
02
December
2011
1:00pm
Zhongliang Zu
Vanderbilt University
CERT vs. CEST: a new approach to image amide exchange   (more ...)
CERT vs. CEST: a new approach to image amide exchange   (hide ...)

Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) has been used in many applications. However, the traditional asymmetry analysis has limitations so that the conventional CEST contrast is sensitive to some non-ideal cases including B0 inhomogeneity, macromolecular pool asymmetry, and lipid. We study the oscillation of pulsed-CEST signal as a function of irradiation flip angle and name it chemical exchange rotation transfer (CERT). A new contrast (double angle APT) was provided based on CERT to increase the robustness of APT signal to the non-ideal cases. In addition, a ratiometric was also provided based on CERT to get concentration independent pH measurement.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
05
December
2011
1:00pm
Rankin McGugin
Vanderbilt University
High-resolution fMRI of perceptual expertise in the Ventral Temporal Cortex at 7-Tesla
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
09
December
2011
1:00pm
Nellie Byun
Vanderbilt University
Central effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 potentiation determined by pharmacologic MRI   (more ...)
Central effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 potentiation determined by pharmacologic MRI   (hide ...)

Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) has been used to assess the effects of specific agents on regional changes in brain activity and their associated hemodynamic effects. Previous preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential of compounds that target the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) for the treatment of schizophrenia. Both typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs suppress amphetamine (Amph)-induced hyperlocomotion in rodents, so this model is considered to be able to predict the antipsychotic efficacy of a compound. VU0360172 is a selective mGluR5 positive allosteric modulator that reverses Amph-induced hyperlocomotion in rats. We are currently using phMRI to determine whether potentiation of mGluR5 with VU0360172 can attenuate Amph-induced brain activation and to identify the specific brain regions underlying the compound’s ability to modulate Amph-induced cerebral blood volume changes as well as the effects of compound alone.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
12
December
2011
1:00pm
Edward Hubbard
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
16
December
2011
1:00pm
Henry Ong
University of Pennsylvania
Indirect Detection of Axonal Architecture with Q-space Imaging   (more ...)
Indirect Detection of Axonal Architecture with Q-space Imaging   (hide ...)

Evaluating axon morphology would provide insights into connectivity, maturation, and disease pathology. Conventional diffusion MRI can provide metrics that are related to axon morphology, but cannot measure specific parameters such as mean axon diameter. Q-space imaging (QSI), an advanced diffusion MRI technique, offers potential for indirect estimation of specific axonal architecture metrics by exploiting the regularity of molecular diffusion barriers from axon membranes and myelin sheaths.

QSI theory stipulates that the molecular diffusion during the diffusion gradient must be negligible. Consequently, strong gradient amplitudes not commercially available are needed to accurately study structures as small as axons. By using a custom 5000 G/cm single axis gradient and RF coil set, we have sufficient gradient strength to execute near ideal QSI experiments. With these unique capabilities, we can therefore investigate the true potential of QSI imaging to indirectly assess axon morphology. We examined excised fixed mouse spinal cords with QSI to estimate mean axon diameter, axon diameter distribution, and intracellular volume fraction and compared the results with histology.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
11
January
2012
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Jason Tucker-Schwartz
Vanderbilt University
Photothermal Optical Coherence Tomography as a Molecular Imaging Tool
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Jashum Uddin
Vanderbilt University
Cyclooxygenase-2 Targeted Imaging of Inflammation and Cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
January
2012
1:00pm
Jack Virostko
Vanderbilt University
Molecular Imaging of Diabetes Progression   (more ...)
Molecular Imaging of Diabetes Progression   (hide ...)

I will discuss progress in multimodal imaging (bioluminescence, CT, and PET) of the pancreatic beta cell, the cell type responsible for insulin production. I will demonstrate tomographic reconstruction of bioluminescent sources and coregistration with two novel, complementary models to evaluate a PET radiotracer thought to target pancreatic beta cells. Tomographic reconstruction of the bioluminescent signal in mice expressing luciferase only in pancreatic beta cells was used to delineate the pancreas and was co-registered with PET and CT images. This strategy enabled unambiguous identification of the pancreas on PET images, permitting accurate quantification of the pancreatic PET signal. To determine whether the radiotracer reflects beta cell mass, conditional, specific, and rapid mouse beta cell ablation was induced and imaged by BLI and PET imaging. To determine whether these ligands bound human beta cells in vivo, mice were transplanted with luciferase-expressing human islets and imaged using bioluminescence and PET imaging. This data demonstrates the utility of co-registered multimodal imaging as a platform for evaluation and validation of candidate ligands for imaging islets. I will discuss additional candidate ligands that are currently being evaluated using this model system.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
25
January
2012
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Jennifer Whisenant
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Biomarkers of HER2+ Breast Cancer Treatment Response
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Vanessa Bright
Vanderbilt University
Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide as a Nanovaccine
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
January
2012
1:00pm
Richard Dortch
Vanderbilt University
Magnetization Transfer Imaging: Developments and Applications in Human Neurological Disorders   (more ...)
Magnetization Transfer Imaging: Developments and Applications in Human Neurological Disorders   (hide ...)

In addition to the free water protons typically observed in MRI, there are protons residing in, or closely associated with, immobile macromolecules in tissue. Typical imaging sequences do not directly detect this pool of protons because they exhibit very short transverse relaxation times and, therefore, lose coherence before their signal can be captured. This macromolecule proton pool can, however, be indirectly detected by exploiting its coupling to the free water pool via chemical exchange and/or dipolar mechanisms [referred to together as the magnetization transfer (MT) effect]. Previous studies have shown that the bulk of the MT effect in myelinated tissue arises from myelin-associated lipids, suggesting that MT contrast may be a more specific marker for myelin pathology than conventional imaging methods. In this talk, I will discuss our development of robust, clinically feasible MT imaging sequences for the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves at 3.0 and 7.0 T. Preliminary application of these sequences to disorders affecting central and peripheral myelin will also be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
30
January
2012
1:00pm
Rob Barry
Vanderbilt University
Functional Imaging of the Brain and Spinal Cord at 7 Tesla: Old Algorithms, New Tricks, and Cool Applications
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
03
February
2012
1:00pm
Limin Chen
Vanderbilt University
Longitudinal fMRI of cortical plasticity following spinal cord injury in adult non-human primates   (more ...)
Longitudinal fMRI of cortical plasticity following spinal cord injury in adult non-human primates   (hide ...)

Somatosensory cortices are capable of considerable reactivation and somatotopic reorganization after the loss of cutaneous afferents input from parts of the body. This reorganization is associated with behavioral recovery, but time courses and the underlying neural mechanism of cortical reorganization are not well understood. By taking advantage of noninvasiveness of fMRI and the high resolution at ultra-high MRI field (9.4T), we longitudinally mapped the dynamic reorganization of the digit representation in area 3b (the primary somatosensory cortex of primates) during the behavioral recovery period after a unilateral section of the dorsal column of spinal cord. We found that the extent of reorganization of the input-deprived digit region was correlated with the behavioral deficit of spinal cord lesioned animals on a food reaching and retrieving task. To validate the fMRI findings, we compared fMRI activation maps of the digits with maps defined by high resolution optical imaging (OI) and dense microelectrode recordings. Functional imaging (fMRI and OI) maps of input-deprived single digits were larger than those defined by neuronal electrical responses. In contrast to normal area 3b cortex, neuronal electrical activity of input-deprived cortical regions showed a frequency dependent dissociation between spiking and local field potentials. Our findings demonstrate that fMRI is a valuable tool for monitoring cortical plasticity. However, the observation of a spatial disagreement between functional imaging and maps of neuronal electrical activity and the dissociation between unit spiking and local field potential call for more cautious interpretations of BOLD fMRI findings in pathological conditions.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
06
February
2012
1:00pm
Swati Rane
Vanderbilt University
Functional Imaging of Neurological Disorders
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
07
February
2012
12:00pm

Special Seminar
Guozheng Liu
NOTE: Time 4-5pm

University of Massachusetts
Antibody Pre-targeting for Cancer Imaging and Therapy
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
08
February
2012
12:00pm
Aliya Gifford
Vanderbilt University
Molecular Imaging Of Brown Adipose Tissue And Its Connection To Cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Joshua Banks
Vanderbilt University
17Oxygen MR Imaging of Tumor Oxygen Utilization
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
10
February
2012
1:00pm
David Zald
Vanderbilt University
Some New Directions in Functional Connectivity Abstract   (more ...)
Some New Directions in Functional Connectivity Abstract   (hide ...)

Neuroimaging data is increasingly used to understand the connectivity of different brain regions. I will focus on two relatively new techniques for understanding functional connectivity. Meta-Analytic Connectivity Modeling (MACM) probes the extent to which functional areas co-activate across studies in the literature. Unlike studies that focus on resting state data, the MACM approach allows examination of task-related activations, and thus allows analysis of the types of tasks associated with a given connectivity pattern. We have recently used this technique to reveal functional connections of the human orbitofrontal cortex. I will also describe the use of whole brain metrics based on graph theory analysis to explore group or individual differences in connectivity patterns. We have recently used this approach to examine whether the personality trait of impulsivity is characterized by network features at the whole brain level. In both cases I will describe some of the opportunities afforded by these techniques as well as some of the key limitations.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
13
February
2012
1:00pm
Jennifer Pryweller
Vanderbilt University
Browbeating Brownian Motion: perils, pitfalls and ongoing discussion of protocols for diffusion imaging
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
17
February
2012
1:00pm
William Grissom
Vanderbilt University
Nonuniform and multidimensional Shinnar-Le Roux RF pulse design algorithm   (more ...)
Nonuniform and multidimensional Shinnar-Le Roux RF pulse design algorithm   (hide ...)

The Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) radiofrequency (RF) pulse design algorithm is widely used for designing slice-selective RF pulses due to its intuitiveness, optimality, and speed. SLR is limited, however, in that it is only capable of designing one-dimensional pulses played along constant gradients. I will present a nonuniform SLR RF pulse design framework that extends most of the capabilities of classical SLR to nonuniform gradient trajectories and multiple dimensions. Specifically, like classical SLR, the new method is a hard pulse approximation-based technique that uses filter design relationships to produce the lowest power RF pulse that satisfies target magnetization ripple levels. We have validated the new method and compared it to methods conventionally used for nonuniform and multidimensional large-tip-angle RF pulse design.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
22
February
2012
12:00pm
Xia Li
Vanderbilt University
DCE-MRI to predict the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
David Hormuth
Vanderbilt University
Mathematical modeling of tumor cell growth and angiogenesis in rats
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
February
2012
1:00pm
Founder Series Lecture
Ravinder Reddy
University of Pennsylvania
High Resolution Imaging of Glutamate   (more ...)
High Resolution Imaging of Glutamate   (hide ...)

Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the brain and is likely involved in nearly all signal-processing functions of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as being altered in many CNS diseases. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is noninvasive and provides high resolution and exquisite structural details, existing MRI methods are not capable of imaging the distribution of neurotransmitters in the brain. Functional MRI (fMRI) provides information based on changes in blood flow and metabolism, but lacks the sensitivity and specificity to probe these neurotransmitters. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1HMRS), on the other hand, can detect glutamate signature groups using a variety of techniques. However, 1HMRS techniques require long acquisition times and have poor spatial resolution. In this presentation, we will describe a novel MRI technique for imaging glutamate (GluCEST) that provides markedly increased spatial and temporal resolution than 1HMRS. The method exploits the glutamate amine exchange saturation transfer to bulk water. Specifically, preliminary results of pH and concentration dependence of GluCEST in physiological phantoms and animal models will be described. Feasibility of obtaining GluCEST maps from human brain at 7 Tesla, as well as potential overlap form other brain metabolites will be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Ravinder Reddy
University of Pennsylvania
High Resolution Imaging of Glutamate   (more ...)
High Resolution Imaging of Glutamate   (hide ...)

Glutamate is one of the major excitatory neurotransmitters in the brain and is likely involved in nearly all signal-processing functions of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as being altered in many CNS diseases. While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is noninvasive and provides high resolution and exquisite structural details, existing MRI methods are not capable of imaging the distribution of neurotransmitters in the brain. Functional MRI (fMRI) provides information based on changes in blood flow and metabolism, but lacks the sensitivity and specificity to probe these neurotransmitters. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1HMRS), on the other hand, can detect glutamate signature groups using a variety of techniques. However, 1HMRS techniques require long acquisition times and have poor spatial resolution. In this presentation, we will describe a novel MRI technique for imaging glutamate (GluCEST) that provides markedly increased spatial and temporal resolution than 1HMRS. The method exploits the glutamate amine exchange saturation transfer to bulk water. Specifically, preliminary results of pH and concentration dependence of GluCEST in physiological phantoms and animal models will be described. Feasibility of obtaining GluCEST maps from human brain at 7 Tesla, as well as potential overlap form other brain metabolites will be discussed.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
02
March
2012
1:00pm
Anja van der Kolk
University Medical Center Utrecht

Visualizing the Intracranial Vessel Wall with 7.0 Tesla MRI

   (more ...)

Visualizing the Intracranial Vessel Wall with 7.0 Tesla MRI

   (hide ...)

Intracranial atherosclerosis is an important cause of TIA and ischemic stroke. With conventional angiography methods, like DSA or MRA, intracranial arterial pathology only becomes visible when it gives rise to luminal narrowing. More direct visualization of the intracranial arterial vessel wall itself could aid in faster diagnosis and treatment in these patients. A technique for visualizing intracranial arterial vessel walls with 7.0 Tesla MRI is presented, including (future) applications of this technique in the research and clinical practice setting, and validation of this technique using ex vivo material. All applications will be illustrated by patient examples. Preliminary results of the Intracranial Vessel wall Imaging (IVI) study will also be presented.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
07
March
2012
12:00pm
Jason Williams
Vanderbilt University
Establishing Quantitative Imaging in Clinical Trials
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Gennifer Goode
Vanderbilt University
Characterization of the Role of Over-Expression of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Breast Cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
09
March
2012
1:00pm
Saikat Sengupta
Vanderbilt University
Active Markers in MRI: Prospective Motion Correction and Continuous Field Monitoring   (more ...)
Active Markers in MRI: Prospective Motion Correction and Continuous Field Monitoring   (hide ...)

Nuclear magnetic resonance probes can provide real time, location specific, measurements of phase and magnitude variations in an MR experiment. Applications of NMR probes in imaging include catheter tracking, motion correction, magnetic gradient field monitoring and compensation for higher order field perturbations among others. This talk will focus on Prospective Motion correction and field monitoring at high field using multiple NMR probes ( or active markers). The workflow of real time data processing and head motion correction will be described along with preliminary results. A novel method of validating motion correction will be presented. In addition, early results of 0th, 1st and higher order field monitoring will also be presented
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
16
March
2012
1:00pm
Alex Maier
Vanderbilt University, Psychology Dept.
When fMRI and neurophysiology disagree: How does activity in the pri-mary visual cortex relate to perceptual experience?   (more ...)
When fMRI and neurophysiology disagree: How does activity in the pri-mary visual cortex relate to perceptual experience?   (hide ...)

The primary visual cortex (V1) is one of the best studied structures of the primate brain and much of its functional properties are well understood, but wheth-er its neural activity contributes to our conscious experience is a matter of long-standing debate. Using visual illusions such as perceptual suppression, in which a salient visual pattern escapes perception entirely, experimenters can ask if neural responses encode an observer’s perceptual interpretation or if they truthfully rep-resent the physical structure of a stimulus instead. Single neuron recordings in ma-caque monkeys as well as neuroimaging studies in humans have successfully ap-plied this paradigm to determine the extent to which activity in primary visual cor-tex reflects perceptual experience. However, while neurophysiological data from monkeys suggests that V1 neurons represent retinal input regardless of a subject’s perceptual state, human neuroimaging (fMRI) studies consistently demonstrate the presence of a strong perceptual signal. To understand the basis of this discrepancy, and to compare V1 signals di-rectly during perceptual suppression, we conducted fMRI experiments and neuronal recordings in monkeys that were trained to indicate their perception during this visual illusion. Under conditions in which a stimulus was present but rendered per-ceptually invisible, we found a sharp divergence between single neuron responses and the hemodynamic fMRI responses in V1, resolving previously discrepant results. Yet, we also found a direct correlate of the perception-related fMRI response in the so-called local field potential (LFP), which might signify the presence of an unknown neural mechanism that correlates with the subject’s perceptual state. We have started to investigate the cellular basis of this signal by converting LFP into a meas-ure of current flow across cellular membranes for the entire laminar structure of the cortical sheet. Using this technique, we have found a strong functional division be-tween the upper and lower layers of V1, suggesting selective modulation by intrinsic connections, other cortical areas and subcortical structures, respectively. These findings, taken together, suggest that the perceptual outcome of visual stimulation is defined by a dynamic network spanning multiple cortical areas, in-cluding V1. Future work will determine the neural dynamics of inter-areal interac-tions underlying conscious perceptual experience.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
21
March
2012
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar
Nkiruka Atuegwu
Vanderbilt University
Integration of DCE and DW- MRI data and a simple mathematical model to predict breast tumor cellularity and treatment response during neoadjuvant chemotherapy
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Julie Sterling
Vanderbilt University
Developing Imaging Techniques for Early Detection of Tumors in Bone
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
March
2012
1:00pm
Daniel Reich
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Cancelled
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
30
March
2012
1:00pm
Olaf Sporns
Indiana University
Discovering the Human Connectome   (more ...)
Discovering the Human Connectome   (hide ...)

Recent advances in network science have greatly increased our understanding of the structure and function of many networked systems, ranging from transportation networks, to social networks, the internet, ecosystems, and biochemical and gene transcription pathways. Network approaches are also increasingly applied to the brain, at several levels of scale from cells to entire brain systems. We now know that brain networks exhibit a number of characteristic topological features, including small-world attributes, modularity and hubs. I will review recent work on how complex brain networks are organized, and how their structural topology constrains and shapes their capacity to process and integrate information. Particular emphasis will be on the large-scale structure and neural dynamics of the human brain. Reference: Sporns O (2011) Networks of the Brain. MIT Press.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
04
April
2012
12:00pm
Richard Baheza
Vanderbilt University
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Methods for Detection of Calcium Deposits
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Anne Powell
Vanderbilt University
Examining a new mouse model of familial polyposis using TSPO imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
April
2012
1:00pm
Christian Eusemann
Seimens Medical Systems
Recent advances in the field of Computed Tomography   (more ...)
Recent advances in the field of Computed Tomography   (hide ...)

Over the past 5 years, Computed Tomography (CT) has seen tremendous advances in both hardware and software. These changes not only improved scanning capabilities and radiation dose level, but made CT a viable research tool. This presentation will provide an overview about key technological advances and their impact on research, clinical utility, and patients. Specific topics will include new scanning capabilities, individualized scanning, dual energy CT, functional CT, and general dose reduction. The presentation will also illustrate how all of these topics can be combined to improve specific clinical tasks using the example cardiac CT.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
11
April
2012
12:00pm
Joint CIG-ICMIC Seminar NOTE TIME: 1:30-2:30pm
Michelle Demory Beckler
Vanderbilt University
Imaging the effect of EGFR ligand-containing exosomes on cancer cells
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
April
2012
1:00pm
Founder Series Lecture
Daniel Sodickson
NYU
Unexpected Tomography: New Coils, New Computations, and New Contrast for MRI
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Daniel Sodickson
New York University
Unexpected Tomography: New Coils, New Computations, and New Contrast for MRI
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
April
2012
1:00pm
Gary Sulikowski
Vanderbilt University
Organic Synthesis Enabling Studies in Chemical Biology   (more ...)
Organic Synthesis Enabling Studies in Chemical Biology   (hide ...)

Organic synthesis has advanced to the point where essentially any compound structure that can be drawn can be prepared given appropriate resources and labor. However, while complex natural products can be prepared by total synthesis accessing quantities of the target molecule and/or analogs by chemical synthesis alone is difficult. Mutasynthesis and chemobiosynthesis allow the support of biosynthetic machinery to produce novel analogs for biological investigation. In this lecture I will provide examples of this methodology and chemical synthesis in the study of cell cytotoxic macrolides.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
10
May
2012
12:00pm

Walter Gerogescu
NOTE TIME: 2-3pm

Center for Cancer Systems Biology at Vanderbilt University
CellAnimation: an open source MATLAB framework for
microscopy assays
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
18
May
2012
1:00pm
Frank Shellock
University of Southern California
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
June
2012
1:00pm
Amanda Yunker
Vanderbilt University
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
20
August
2012
1:00pm
Linh Dang
UC Berkeley
Dopamine, neural networks, and cognition
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
07
September
2012
1:00pm
Deepti S. Vikram
Development of magnetic resonance techniques for biophysics applications: electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for oxygen measurement and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) for MRI   (more ...)
Development of magnetic resonance techniques for biophysics applications: electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for oxygen measurement and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) for MRI   (hide ...)

Magnetic resonance techniques play an important and irreplaceable role today for both biomedical research as well as clinical applications. This presentation will focus on the development of certain aspects of two magnetic resonance techniques: electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) for oxygen measurement and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) for high field MRI applications. EPR spectroscopy and imaging, similar to MRI, has the capability to contribute to clinical applications. It is, currently, a widely used research technique to measure the concentration of oxygen in biological systems and has been used for applications in the fields of cancer research, heart disease and other pathological conditions that involve changes in oxygen content. The talk will include evaluating the temporal resolution of the technique for dynamic oxygen measurements. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recent MRI method to estimate the magnetic susceptibility tensor in the human brain. The method can yield important tissue information useful in evaluating pathophysiology relevant to degenerative neurological diseases. The susceptibility anisotropy information can also be used to determine and map the orientation of white matter fibers in the human brain. Further, the susceptibility tensor description can be used to explain the orientation dependence of phase and consequently the phase contrast obtained in MRI images. The experimental method involves acquisition using gradient-echo pulse sequences and post-processing of phase/frequency information for solving the inverse problem. The STI method is highly suitable at the high magnetic fields associated with clinical brain research in MRI.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
12
September
2012
12:00pm
Tricia Thornton-Wells
Vanderbilt University
Chemo-Brain: Fact or Fiction?
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Dewei Tang
Vanderbilt University
TSPO Fluorescent Probe for Cancer Diagnosis and Probe Discovery
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
24
September
2012
1:00pm
CCI
Vanderbilt University
CCI Overview
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
26
September
2012
12:00pm
Matthew Hight
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Apoptosis: A Look at Caspase Inhibitors
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Jason Buck
Vanderbilt University
Effect of bridging heteroatoms in aryoxyanilides for cancer imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
28
September
2012
1:00pm
Zhipeng Cao
Pennsylvania State University
Advances in Simulation and Thermography for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging   (more ...)
Advances in Simulation and Thermography for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging   (hide ...)

This presentation will include two major research directions in my Ph.D. The first part will include constructing an Bloch-based simulator with realistic electromagnetic fields for parallel MRI, and utilizing it for performance prediction of a 14 T MRI system planned in South Korea. The second part will be a reconstruction study based on compressed sensing to accelerate MR Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) Shift temperature imaging process for high field RF safety monitoring.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
10
October
2012
12:00pm
Lynn Samuelson
Vanderbilt University
Nanodendrons for Reporting Drug Delivery
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Alex Walsh
Vanderbilt University
Optical metabolic imaging identifies early treatment response in breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
22
October
2012
1:00pm
Doug Godwin
Vanderbilt University
Overlapping Neural Correlates of Awareness and Attention with fMRI
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
24
October
2012
12:00pm
Jack Skinner
Vanderbilt University
MR Perfusion Imaging of Glioma
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
John Spear
Vanderbilt University
Influence of diffusion through internal susceptibility gradients on T1rho dispersion
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
02
November
2012
1:00pm
Harold Swartz
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Clinical EPR: Opportunities and Challenges   (more ...)
Clinical EPR: Opportunities and Challenges   (hide ...)

The development and use of in vivo techniques for experimental applications of EPR in animals has been very successful and now has led to attractive clinical applications. This presentation provides an overview of the challenges, opportunities, and results as in vivo EPR is extended into use in human subjects. The most widespread clinical use is oximetry, where EPR can make repeated and accurate measurements of pO2 in tissues, which provides clinicians with information that bears directly on diagnosis and therapy, especially for oncology, peripheral vascular disease, and wound healing. The other area of importance in human subjects is the ability of in vivo EPR to measure clinically significant exposures to ionizing radiation ‘after-the-fact’, due to accidents, terrorism, or nuclear war. The unique capabilities of in vivo EPR to detect and characterize free radicals could be applied to measure free radical intermediates from drugs and oxidative processes, including measurements of nitric oxide. These unique capabilities, combined with the sensitivity of EPR spectra to the immediate environment (e.g. pH, molecular motion, charge), have resulted in productive applications in animals that may be adapted for use in humans.The most immediate clinical application, which has a reasonable probability of becoming a widely used clinical tool, is to repeatedly measure the pO2 in tumors. This unique capability could have effective applications in developing improved therapeutic approaches and in personalized medicine. An example of an improved therapeutic approach is to determine the effects of combined therapy such as antiangiogenesis therapy combined with radiation therapy, to determine the optimum timing for the two modalities. This could resolve the current paradoxes in attempts to apply this combination in human subjects. An example of personalized therapy is to determine if and when a subject responds to hyperoxic therapy aimed at enhancing the response of radiation therapy. Patients whose tumor pO2 would not be treated with this combined therapy while those that did respond could have their radiation therapy delivered at the optimum window of oxygenation observed in their tumor.A network of cooperating institutions is being developed using the clinical EPR spectrometer developed at Dartmouth. This instrument is being used for both preclinical studies and direct clinical applications aimed at improving therapeutic efficacy.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
05
November
2012
1:00pm
Ryan Stevenson
Vanderbilt University
Functional Imaging of Multimodal Integration
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
07
November
2012
12:00pm
David Hormuth
Vanderbilt University
Incorporation of Imaging Data into a Mathematical Model of Tumor Cell Proliferation and Angiogenesis
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Andrew Asman
Vanderbilt University
Anomaly Detection using Out-of-Atlas Likelihood Estimation: Application to Malignant Glioma
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
28
November
2012
12:00pm
David Smith
Vanderbilt University
High field breast DCE-MRI using compressed sensing
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Ashley Stokes
Vanderbilt University
Development of dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI methods to assess tumor hemodynamics
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
12
December
2012
12:00pm
Jennifer Whisenant
Vanderbilt University
Multiparametric Assessment of Treatment Response in Breast Cancer Xenografts
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Natenael Semmineh
Vanderbilt University
The Assessment of Cellular Packing Heterogeneity in Brain Tumors Using DSC-MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
11
January
2013
1:00pm
Eduard Chekmenev
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
16
January
2013
12:00pm
Stephanie Barnes
Vanderbilt University
Investigating potential imaging biomarkers of treatment response in a preclinical model of triple negative breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Tricia Thornton-Wells
Vanderbilt University
Chemo-Brain: Fact or Fiction?
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
18
January
2013
1:00pm
Brian Welch
Vanderbilt University
Brown Adipose Tissue Quantification Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging   (more ...)
Brown Adipose Tissue Quantification Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging   (hide ...)

Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a thermogenic tissue known to be present in many small mammals and human infants. In human subjects, BAT is believed to diminish with age and be essentially undetectable in adults. However, recent 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) studies suggest that small but metabolically significant amounts of BAT persist into adulthood. These studies further suggest an inverse relationship between BAT and obesity, although it remains unclear whether reduced BAT amount and/or activity promotes or results from obesity. The objective of this research is to develop and validate MRI methods for characterizing human BAT, with a focus on differentiating between BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT) under basal and activated conditions. The current imaging method for differentiating BAT and WAT employs a combination of 18F-FDG PET and x-ray computed tomography (CT), which requires an undesirable radiation dose. This work is therefore important in developing MRI methods that will replace the current PET-CT methods and enable the study of BAT in many interesting cohorts of human subjects in longitudinal studies without radiation concerns.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
January
2013
1:00pm
Charles Manning
Vanderbilt University
Probes for Molecular Imaging of Cancer
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
30
January
2013
12:00pm
Lori Arlinghaus
Vanderbilt University
Clinical cancer applications: Treatment assessment using diffusion-weighted and magnetization transfer MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Chris Jarrett
Vanderbilt University
Physical Basis of Acousto-Optical Imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
February
2013
1:00pm
Moritz Zeiss
German Cancer Research Center
From Spin-lock to Hyper-CEST - principles and application of chemical exchange saturation transfer for cancer research
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
08
February
2013
1:00pm
Oliver McIntyre
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
13
February
2013
12:00pm
Richard Baheza
Vanderbilt University
MRI Methods for Detecting Calcium Deposits in the Breast
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Darren Tyson
Vanderbilt University
Fractional Proliferation: A method to quantify cell proliferation dynamics and heterogeneity using automated fluorescence microscopy
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
February
2013
1:00pm
Hunsuk Shim
Emory University School of Medicine
Coping with Clinical Unmet Needs using Advanced PET & MRSI (1. PET tracer development to detect the metastatic potential; 2. High resolution volumetric MR spectroscopic imaging for brain tumor management)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
22
February
2013
1:00pm
Ryan Robinson
Vanderbilt University
What I learned as a Philips Clinical Scientist
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
27
February
2013
12:00pm
Jared Weis
Vanderbilt University
Biomechanics Modeling in Breast Cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Desmond Campbell
Vanderbilt University
Nuclear Breast Imaging with Limited Angle Tomography
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
March
2013
1:00pm
Carissa Cascio
Vanderbilt University
The Role of Affective Circuits in Sensory and Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
08
March
2013
1:00pm
Lori Jordan
Vanderbilt University
Pediatric Stroke: What are the Key Questions that Advanced Neuroimaging Can Help Answer?
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
13
March
2013
12:00pm
Xia Li
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative analysis of DWI- and DCE-MRI breast cancer data
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Michelle Demory-Beckler
Vanderbilt University
Imaging colorectal cancer cell exosomes
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
March
2013
1:00pm
Arthur C. Fleischer
Vanderbilt University
Improved Sonographic Techniques for Ovarian Cancer Detection
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
18
March
2013
1:00pm
Ron Cowan
Vanderbilt University
MDMA and Serotonin
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
20
March
2013
12:00pm
Sudheer Rani
Washington University in St Louis

Reconstruction of liver dual input function and In Vivo
Multi-Tissue Efficacy of PPARγ Therapy on Glucose and Fatty
Acid Metabolism in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Rats

cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
22
March
2013
1:00pm
Houchun Harry Hu
Children's Hospital Los Angeles, The Saban Research Institute
Brown Adipose Tissue – Recent Developments, Imaging, and Implications in Human Physiology   (more ...)
Brown Adipose Tissue – Recent Developments, Imaging, and Implications in Human Physiology   (hide ...)

Over the past decade, there has been a tremendous resurgence in scientific interest towards brown adipose tissue (BAT). Several hundred original research and review articles have been published uncovering the cell biology and physiological roles of BAT in both animals and humans. The existence of BAT in mammals and the tissue’s primary role as an organ responsible for non-shivering thermogenesis has been recognized for over half a century. While BAT was previously thought to only exist in humans during fetal growth, infancy, and childhood development, the unequivocal finding of BAT in adults with PET/CT imaging in recent years has motivated investigators to further probe the tissue’s implications in many aspects of human physiology, including metabolism and energy balance, obesity, and musculoskeletal development. In the first part of my presentation, I will review historical findings of BAT and summarize recent knowledge gained from PET/CT imaging in both animals and humans. While PET/CT remains the modality of choice for imaging BAT in adults, MRI is emerging as a viable alternative due to its lack of ionizing radiation and more importantly its greater applicability in studying healthy cohorts, including infants and children. In the second part of my presentation, I will discuss in detail both past and recent research efforts to characterize BAT morphology and metabolic activity with proton spectroscopy and chemical-shift-based water-fat MRI techniques. I will present a logical series of experiments and provide illustrative examples from mice and adult humans, as well as recent clinical data gathered at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles in infants, children, and teenagers. I will conclude with an outlook on future research and comment briefly on other potential MR strategies for characterizing BAT.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
25
March
2013
1:00pm
Zhaohua Ding
Vanderbilt University
Novel Approaches to Functional Connectivity
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
27
March
2013
12:00pm
Jason Williams
Vanderbilt University
Cancer Imaging in VICC Clinical Trials: An Update
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Jason Tucker-Schwartz
Vanderbilt University
In vivo Photothermal Optical Coherence Tomography using Gold Nanorod Contrast Agents
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
29
March
2013
1:00pm
Feliks Kogan
University of Pennsylvania
Endogenous Amine Proton Exchange Based MRI and Their Applications
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
01
April
2013
1:00pm
Mike Pratte
Vanderbilt University
Psychology: Multivariate fMRI studies of visual feature representations
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
05
April
2013
1:00pm
Daniel Claussen
Vanderbilt University
Mesocorticolimbic function in Parkinson Disease
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
08
April
2013
1:00pm
Rob Barry
Vanderbilt University
Functional connectivity of the spinal cord: 7T fMRI
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
10
April
2013
12:00pm
Erin Rericha
Vanderbilt University
Collective Migration behaviors in 3D in vitro collagen
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
12
April
2013
1:00pm
Amanda Yunker
Vanderbilt University
High Intensity Focused Ultrasound
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
15
April
2013
1:00pm
Zhoubing Xu
Vanderbilt University
Electrical Engineering: Virtual reality in medical imaging
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
19
April
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar: ISMRM
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
22
April
2013
1:00pm
FMRI methods discussion
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
26
April
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar: ISMRM
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
29
April
2013
1:00pm
Todd Monroe
Vanderbilt University
Nursing Fellow: Neuroimaging of pain in older adults
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
01
May
2013
12:00pm
Jashim Uddin
Vanderbilt University
Near-Infrared COX-2 Probes Enabling Efficient Detection of Inflammation and Tumor Xenografts
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Junzhong Xu
Vanderbilt University
Assessment of tumor microstructure using temporal diffusion spectroscopy
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
03
May
2013
1:00pm
Hakmook Kang
Vanderbilt University
Controlling Global Error Rates in fMRI Data Analysis   (more ...)
Controlling Global Error Rates in fMRI Data Analysis   (hide ...)

Standard fMRI analyses use a voxel based linear regression model after applying spatial smoothing and common approaches to adjust for the multiple testing problem in fMRI include random field theory (RFT), and false discovery rate (FDR). The primary limitation of these approaches is that they are still conservative in finding positive voxels, even though they are known to be less conservative than the Bonferroni correction. Moreover, the probability of a false positive is fixed at a certain level (e.g., 0.05) and does not change at all regardless of the amount of data. To overcome these two main disadvantages of current approaches, we propose an approach based on likelihood ratio at each voxel, which allows the probabilities of both false positive and negative results to converge to zero as the sample size grows. The characteristics of this approach are illustrated via simulation study and real data analysis.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
10
May
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar: Commencement
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
17
May
2013
1:00pm
Richard Dortch
Vanderbilt University
What can quantitative MRI tell us about the pathophysiology of inherited neuropathies?   (more ...)
What can quantitative MRI tell us about the pathophysiology of inherited neuropathies?   (hide ...)

The overall goal of our research is to develop and validate a quantitative, multi-parametric [diffusion, relaxometry, magnetization transfer (MT)] set of MRI techniques for the assessment of pathological and functional changes accompanying human peripheral neuropathy in vivo. Our initial focus has been on the development of a robust, clinically feasible MT ratio (MTR) imaging sequence to probe myelin content changes in the sciatic nerve of patients with inherited neuropathies, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. In this talk, I will discuss: i) our methods for addressing the technical challenges (e.g., nonrigid motion, B1 inhomogeneities) associated with MTR imaging of the sciatic nerve in vivo, and ii) our initial findings in primary demyelinating (CMT1A) and axonal (CMT2) cohorts. Finally, I will discuss some of the limitations of MTR imaging in these cohorts and our plans moving forward.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
May
2013
1:00pm
Jeffry Nyman
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Fracture Resistance
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
31
May
2013
1:00pm
Founder Series Lecture
Fahmeed Hyder
Yale School of Medicine
Quantitative basis for neuroimaging of cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI   (more ...)
Quantitative basis for neuroimaging of cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI   (hide ...)

Layer-specific neurophysiologic, hemodynamic, and metabolic measurements are needed to interpret high-resolution fMRI data in the cerebral cortex. We examined how neurovascular and neurometabolic couplings vary vertically in the rat’s somatosensory cortex. During sensory stimulation we measured dynamic layer-specific responses of (LFP) and multi-unit activity (MUA) as well as blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) and which in turn were used to calculate changes in oxidative metabolism (CMRO2) with calibrated fMRI. Both BOLD and CBV decreased from superficial to deep laminae, but these responses were not well correlated with either layer-specific LFP or MUA. However CBF was stable across laminae similar to LFP. But CMRO2 and MUA varied across cortex in a correlated manner and both were reduced in superficial lamina. These results lay the framework for quantitative neuroimaging across cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI methods.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Fahmeed Hyder
Yale University
Quantitative basis for neuroimaging of cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI   (more ...)
Quantitative basis for neuroimaging of cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI   (hide ...)

Layer-specific neurophysiologic, hemodynamic, and metabolic measurements are needed to interpret high-resolution fMRI data in the cerebral cortex. We examined how neurovascular and neurometabolic couplings vary vertically in the ratâ??s somatosensory cortex. During sensory stimulation we measured dynamic layer-specific responses of (LFP) and multi-unit activity (MUA) as well as blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, blood volume (CBV) and blood flow (CBF) and which in turn were used to calculate changes in oxidative metabolism (CMRO2) with calibrated fMRI. Both BOLD and CBV decreased from superficial to deep laminae, but these responses were not well correlated with either layer-specific LFP or MUA. However CBF was stable across laminae similar to LFP. But CMRO2 and MUA varied across cortex in a correlated manner and both were reduced in superficial lamina. These results lay the framework for quantitative neuroimaging across cortical laminae with calibrated fMRI methods.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
04
September
2013
12:00pm
Kepra McBrayer
Vanderbilt University
Early Detection of Breast Cancer With Dyadic Wavlet Processing
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Rick Abramson
Vanderbilt University
Cancer Imaging Research: A Clinical Radiology Perspective
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
September
2013
1:00pm
Jouke Smink, M.S.
Clinical Scientist MR-Electrophysciology and MR-Interventions - Philips Healthcare
MRI guided interventions in oncology and electrophysiology   (more ...)
MRI guided interventions in oncology and electrophysiology   (hide ...)

MRI guided interventions has been a research topic for more than 15 years. Still, the promised breakthrough in the clinic is yet to come. In this talk results with a new dedicated interventional MRI suite will be presented. This iSuite is developed as a standalone application similar to MR-Hifu. Research collaborations with two sites has led to dedicated applications in electrophysiology and oncology. MR-EP is being developed together with King�s College London. Also the collaboration with catheter startup company IMRICOR has added the integration of MR-safe active catheters, EP mapping and real-time MR. The animal studies so far are preceding the first-in-man which is planned for this year. The University of Magdeburg is using their Panorama HFO open scanner and the iSuite on a daily basis for their oncology work. The iSuite is used during a.o. biopsies, HDR brachytherapy and spinal injections for pain therapy.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
September
2013
1:00pm
Charles Caskey
Vanderbilt University
Ultrasonic molecular imaging and image-guided therapy   (more ...)
Ultrasonic molecular imaging and image-guided therapy   (hide ...)

Ultrasound has traditionally been a diagnostic as well as therapeutic modality due to its ability to create images as well as provide noninvasive localized heating, ablation, and mechanical agitation within the body. Recent innovations have expanded the use of ultrasound to areas such as molecular imaging and image-guided therapy. These advancements were enabled by improved technology and also by combining ultrasound with other imaging modalities and disciplines. For example, targeted imaging of the vasculature can be achieved by injecting micron-sized, encapsulated bubbles (microbubbles) with ligands that specifically bind to vascular integrins such as avb3. I will discuss research that addresses challenges in targeted ultrasonic imaging, including achieving high contrast-to-tissue ratios, selectively imaging targeted microbubbles, and generating 3D maps of targeted vasculature. Since these microbubble contrast agents can also locally enhance vascular permeability under specific ultrasound conditions, they can act as therapeutic agents as well. I will also introduce research about using ultrasound contrast to deliver drugs beyond the vasculature and present results where we delivered chemotherapeutics beyond the blood brain barrier to treat a murine model of metastatic melanoma. Finally, I will cover ultrasound- and MR-based thermometry, which provide feedback and guidance for image-guided therapeutic heating procedures, such as uterine fibroid ablation, cancer ablation, or heat-based immunomodulation. With targeted imaging capabilities, microbubble-based drug delivery, and the ability to apply and monitor hyperthermia, ultrasound continues to occupy a unique role in image-guided therapy.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
18
September
2013
12:00pm
Jennifer Whisenant
Vanderbilt University
Features and potential applications of whole body diffusion weighted imaging (DWIBS) in oncology
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Oscar Ayala
Vanderbilt University
Evaluation of Basal Cell Carcinoma using combined Raman spectroscopy - optical coherence tomography (RS-OCT)
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
September
2013
1:00pm
Adam Anderson
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Brain Tissue
Microstructure and Connectivity
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
September
2013
1:00pm
Christoph Juchem
Yale University

Dynamic Multi-Coil Shimming of Mouse, Rat and Human Brain

   (more ...)

Dynamic Multi-Coil Shimming of Mouse, Rat and Human Brain

   (hide ...)

MR imaging and spectroscopy allow the non-invasive measurement of brain function and physiology, but excellent B0 magnetic field homogeneity is required for meaningful results. The correction of static magnetic field imperfections, so-called B0 shimming, is particularly demanding in the brain where air-tissue interfaces create complex and strong distortions.

In my talk, I will present a novel technique for magnetic field modeling and shimming that is based on the combination of fields generated by a matrix of small, generic coils. This multi-coil (MC) approach enables the accurate generation of simple and complex magnetic field shapes in a flexible fashion. Dynamic MC shimming outperforms conventional shimming based on spherical harmonic (SH) functions and provides unrivaled magnetic field homogeneity in mouse, rat and human brain. I will discuss the methodological aspects of MC shimming and demonstrate its benefits for gradient-echo EPI and fMRI. Along with the efficiency gains of MC shimming compared to SH approaches, the MC concept has the potential to 1) replace conventional shim systems that are based on sets of dedicated SH coils and 2) allow optimal object-specific shim solutions similar to object-specific RF coils.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
02
October
2013
12:00pm
Matthew Hight
Vanderbilt University
A Peptide-Based Positron Emission Tomography Probe for In Vivo Detection of Caspase Activity in Apoptotic Cells
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Frederick Bryan
Vanderbilt University
Correcting for Intra-voxel Movement in DTI
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
04
October
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
07
October
2013
1:00pm
Mary Ellen Koran
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease using PET and MRI
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
11
October
2013
1:00pm
Daniel Gochberg
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Magnetization Exchange
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
October
2013
1:00pm
Bennett Landman, Scott Burns, Brian Boyd, Ben Yvernault
Vanderbilt University
Study Design and Management with XNAT, RedCap and ACCRE
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
16
October
2013
12:00pm
Jason Williams
Vanderbilt University
Prone/supine FDG-PET Imaging of Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Alex K. Smith
Vanderbilt University
Differentiation between glioma and radiation necrosis using molecular magnetic resonance imaging of endogenous proteins and peptides
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
18
October
2013
1:00pm
Limin Chen
Vanderbilt University
Longitudinal MRI Assessments of Spinal Cord Injury and Brain Plasticity in Squirrel Monkeys   (more ...)
Longitudinal MRI Assessments of Spinal Cord Injury and Brain Plasticity in Squirrel Monkeys   (hide ...)

Spinal cord injuries have devastating consequences for patients, whose motor and/or sensory functions are often severely impaired. Over time, SCI patients can regain some of their lost functions, although the mechanisms mediating these recoveries are not completely understood. The existing literature suggests that both nerve fiber sprouting at the injured spinal cord site and brain plastic changes play crucial roles for the recovery of various sensory functions. To test these hypotheses, the ability to assess longitudinally the functional recovery at both spinal cord and brain levels is essential. In my talk, I will describe our recent team efforts on developing quantitative MRI methods for assessing longitudinally the progression of spinal cord injury and brain plasticity in squirrel monkeys at 9.4T. These new developments will allows us to understand how injured spinal cord tissue heals on its own, how brain adapts following sensory inputs disruption, and how the changes at spinal cord and brain may contribute to the behavioral recovery after spinal cord injury.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
October
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
30
October
2013
12:00pm
David Hormuth
Vanderbilt University
Mathematical Model of glioma growth constrained by in vivo imaging data
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Chris Lankford
Vanderbilt University
A novel method for fast, quantitative, artifact-free T2 mapping of cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
November
2013
1:00pm
Founder Series Lecture -- Seong-Gi Kim, Ph.D.
Neuroimaging Laboratory, University of Pittsburgh
Chemical Exchange Sensitive MRI: Signal sources and sensitivity
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Seong-Gi Kim
University of Pittsburgh
Chemical Exchange Sensitive MRI: Signal sources and sensitivity
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
06
November
2013
12:00pm
Stephanie Barnes
Vanderbilt University
Evaluating imaging biomarkers as early indicators of treatment response in a preclinical model of triple negative breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Lynn Samuelson
Vanderbilt University
Detecting biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma in urine with BSI
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
08
November
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
November
2013
1:00pm
Richard Abramson, M.D.
Vanderbilt University
Assessing response to cancer treatment: challenges at the imaging-oncology interface   (more ...)
Assessing response to cancer treatment: challenges at the imaging-oncology interface   (hide ...)

Assessing response to treatment is a fundamental component of cancer research and clinical care. This presentation will review the evolution of imaging-based cancer treatment response assessment and its application in the research and clinical settings. A critical appraisal of current tumor size-based response assessment techniques will be presented, with a focus on the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). I will explore the landscape of current attempts to move beyond RECIST, and I will discuss challenges for clinical translation of new techniques.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
20
November
2013
12:00pm
Katie Jameson
Vanderbilt University
Genomics 101 for Engineers and Physicists
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Nkiruka Atuegwu
Vanderbilt University
Longitudinal registration of breast PET and MRI data
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
22
November
2013
1:00pm
Dr. Ronald C. Walker
Vanderbilt University
68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT Imaging of Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules and Lung Cancer
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
04
December
2013
12:00pm
Jack Skinner
Vanderbilt University
Perfusion and diffusion imaging in high grade brain tumors
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Jason Tucker-Schwartz
Vanderbilt University
Advancing photothermal optical coherence tomography towards real time three dimensional functional imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
December
2013
1:00pm
Bruce Damon, PhD
Vanderbilt University
RCR Presentation: Reviewing a Scientific Manuscript   (more ...)
RCR Presentation: Reviewing a Scientific Manuscript   (hide ...)

You can download the presentation slides via this link
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
December
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
December
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
December
2013
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
January
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
10
January
2014
1:00pm
Laurie Cutting, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
From Words to Text: Behavioral and Neurobiological Correlates of Reading
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
13
January
2014
1:00pm
Bennett Landman & Mary Ellen Koran
Vanderbilt University
Intersecting imaging and genetics: what it means and where to start
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
15
January
2014
12:00pm
Jared Weis
Vanderbilt University
Biomechanics, modeling, and breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
David Smith
Vanderbilt University
Improving DCE-MRI of cancer using compressed sensing
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
17
January
2014
1:00pm
Jon-Kar Zubieta, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
PET Molecular Imaging as a Neuroscience Tool
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
20
January
2014
1:00pm
Stephan Heckers
Vanderbilt Unversity
Hippocampal dysfunction in psychotic disorders
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
24
January
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
27
January
2014
1:00pm
Doug Godwin
Vanderbilt University
Breakdown of the Brain’s Functional Network Modularity with Awareness
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
29
January
2014
12:00pm
Rebekah Conley
Vanderbilt University
Imaging Intervention for Breast Cancer Surgery
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Karen Ayers
Vanderbilt University
Early experience with FES PET in patients receiving ARN810 for metastatic breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
31
January
2014
1:00pm
Founder Series Lecture -- Lawrence Wald, Ph.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
New Directions for Brain MRI Hardware
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Lawrence Wald, Ph.D.
Massachusetts General Hospital
New Directions for Brain MRI Hardware
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
03
February
2014
1:00pm
Robert Barry
Vanderbilt University
Resting state fMRI of the human spinal cord
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
07
February
2014
1:00pm
Victoria Morgan, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Multimodal MRI in Sports Concussion - Early Results
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
10
February
2014
1:00pm
Jerri Rook
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
12
February
2014
12:00pm
Eliot McKinley
Vanderbilt University
Multiplexed immunofluorescence imaging in colorectal cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
John Spear
Vanderbilt University
Estimating Chemical Exchange Rates from Multi-Dispersion R1ρ Measurements
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
14
February
2014
1:00pm
Feng Wang, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative MRI in Mouse Kidney at 7T
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
17
February
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
21
February
2014
1:00pm
Crystal Coolbaugh, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Personalized Physical Activity Prescription: Activity Monitor Development & Applications   (more ...)
Personalized Physical Activity Prescription: Activity Monitor Development & Applications   (hide ...)

For almost 20 years, public health organizations have published numerous evidence-based reports touting the benefits of physical activity along with recommendations to achieve these health gains. However, these guidelines have been ineffective, and the percentage of inactive American adults has remained alarmingly high. Widespread access to technology has contributed to physical inactivity levels, but these same technology advances provide the means for an objective and personalized approach to physical activity promotion to counter these trends. In this talk, I will describe 1) the development of a monitor to quantify physical activity and physiological responses, 2) the application of this device to explore the relationships between physical activity exposure, health outcomes, and musculoskeletal injuries, and 3) the integration of monitor data into a dynamic web-based application to personalize physical activity prescription.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
24
February
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
28
February
2014
1:00pm
Ron Cowan, M.D., Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging in MDMA (ecstasy) users: evidence for persisting neurotoxicity
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
05
March
2014
12:00pm
Xia Li
Vanderbilt University
Multiparametric analysis using machine learning to predict breast cancer response to NAC
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Fred Harris
Vanderbilt University
Utilizing the 18F-DPA-714 radio-ligand for elucidating the role of TSPO-overexpression in lung cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
07
March
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar (Spring Break)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
10
March
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
14
March
2014
1:00pm
Dan Alexander, Ph.D.
University College of London, Centre for Medical Image Computing
Microstructure imaging with diffusion MRI   (more ...)
Microstructure imaging with diffusion MRI   (hide ...)

My talk will give an overview of the research in my group in developing microstructure imaging techniques using MRI and other activities. The aim of microstructure imaging is to estimate and map histological features of tissue non-invasively. Diffusion MRI sensitises the MR signal to the dispersion of water arising from diffusion. It is a cornerstone of microstructure imaging, because it gives unique sensitivity to the cellular architecture of tissue, which determines the pattern of water dispersion. Other MR modalities, such as relaxometry, magnetisation transfer, and susceptibility imaging can also contribute. I will talk about the work we have done towards development of the biophysical models that underpin parameter estimation (Panagiotaki et al Neuroimage 2012; Ferizi et al MRM 2014); the design of imaging sequences and protocols that provide and maximise sensitivity (Alexander MRM 2008; Drobnjak et al JMR 2010); specific techniques that emerge such as ActiveAx (Alexander et al Neuroimage 2010; Zhang et al Neuroimage 2011) and NODDI (Zhang et al Neuroimage 2012) for neuroimaging, and VERDICT (Panagiotaki et al Cancer Research 2014) for cancer imaging; and their validation and application. I will also mention more recent work on the development of computational models for disease progression with application in Alzheimer's disease and other neurological conditions; see (Fonteijn et al Neuroimage 2012).
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
17
March
2014
1:00pm
Richard McClure
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
19
March
2014
12:00pm
Sudheer Rani
Vanderbilt University
A tumor bioreactor for cancer imaging applications: Modeling and therapy response
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Pooja Gaur
Vanderbilt University
New acquisition and reconstruction approaches for MR thermometry
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
21
March
2014
1:00pm
Peter Hardy
University of Kentucky
Using Convection Enhanced Delivery to Treat Neurodegenerative Disease
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
24
March
2014
1:00pm
Carly Demopoulos
Vanderbilt University
Relationship between sensory processing and social cognition in developmental social disorders
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
28
March
2014
1:00pm
Founder Series Lecture
Samuel Achilefu, Ph.D.
Washington University
Molecular Fluorescence Image-Guided Cancer Resection: From Bench to Bedside
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
1:00pm
Samuel Achilefu, Ph.D.
Washington University
Molecular Fluorescence Image-Guided Cancer Resection: From Bench to Bedside
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
31
March
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
02
April
2014
12:00pm
Lori Arlinghaus
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative MRI in clinical cancer trials at Vanderbilt: An Update
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Anna Sorace
Vanderbilt University
Vascular normalization in HER2+ breast cancer in a preclinical model
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
04
April
2014
1:00pm
Melissa Skala, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University Optics
Cellular-Level Metabolic Imaging to Predict Anti-Cancer Drug Response
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
07
April
2014
1:00pm
Jodi Weinstein
Vanderbilt University
Dorsal Raphé Functional Connectivity in Depression
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
11
April
2014
1:00pm
Carlos Faraco, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Stratifying Stroke Risk in Patients with Intracranial Stenosis using Hemodynamic Imaging   (more ...)
Stratifying Stroke Risk in Patients with Intracranial Stenosis using Hemodynamic Imaging   (hide ...)

Patients with ischemic steno-occlusive disease are at high risk of recurrent stroke, but the correct treatment for these patients is currently unclear. Current standard practice for evaluating stroke risk in such patients is focused on angiographic imaging which is used to visualize stenosis severity. To enhance stratification of stroke risk and guide treatment, it would be of equal importance to assess cerebral hemodynamics and vascular compliance. Currently, we have implemented a clinical protocol at VUMC which uses hemodynamic imaging modalities, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) imaging, in conjunction with a hypercarbic hyperoxic gas challenge to assess cerebrovascular reactivity. In this talk I will demonstrate how we have successfully used this protocol to assess cerebrovascular reactivity in patients with intracranial stenosis, and how these methods are particularly sensitive to lateralizing disease. Additionally, I will show how hypercarbic hyperoxic BOLD and ASL can be used to longitudinally monitor the success of cerebral reperfusion following cerebral revascularization surgery in a sub-population of patients with an intracranial stenosis of unknown etiology, referred to as Moyamoya disease. Lastly, I will demonstrate how these methods have allowed us to better understand the origins of variations in the BOLD signal.

VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
April
2014
1:00pm
Sepi Shokouhi
Vanderbilt University
Weighted two-point correlation functions in Aβ-PET analysis
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
16
April
2014
12:00pm
Kirsten Diggins
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative analysis of cancer cell subpopulations using cross-platform imaging and single-cell flow cytometry
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Ashely Stokes
Vanderbilt University
Assessment of a multiple-echo DSC-MRI Approach with T1 and T2* leakage correction for brain tumor perfusion imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
18
April
2014
1:00pm
Chunming Li
University of Pennsylvania
Image Segmentation and Related Issues in
Medical Imaging
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
21
April
2014
1:00pm
Lauren Libero
Vanderbilt University
Multimodal MRI examination of autism spectrum disorder
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
25
April
2014
1:00pm
Gregor Neuert, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative imaging approaches in signaling and regulation of the "dark matter" of the genome
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
30
April
2014
12:00pm
Julianna Ianni
Vanderbilt University
Gradient-based trajectory correction for radial projection imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Allen Newton
Vanderbilt University
Clinical DSC-MRI Imaging at Vanderbilt
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
02
May
2014
1:00pm
Bob Galloway, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Translating Innovation, Innovating Translation
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
09
May
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar (ISMRM)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
16
May
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar (ISMRM)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
May
2014
1:00pm
Kathy Ferrera, Ph.D.
UC Davis, BME
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
22
August
2014
1:00pm
Rachelle Crescenzi
University of Pennsylvania
CEST MRI
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
12
September
2014
1:00pm
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
17
September
2014
12:00pm
Russ Rockne
NWU
Imaging, math and me makes three: using modeling to generate testable biological hypotheses driven by in vivo imaging data
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
19
September
2014
1:00pm
Dave Piston
Vanderbilt University
Imaging the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Insulin Secretion
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
September
2014
1:00pm
Michael Miga
Vanderbilt University
Biophysical Model-Embedded Systems for Therapeutic and Imaging Applications   (more ...)
Biophysical Model-Embedded Systems for Therapeutic and Imaging Applications   (hide ...)

Often within the medical community, the translation of computational biophysical models for use in therapeutic and imaging applications has been limited due to complexity, speed, or insufficient understanding of constitutive behavior. As a result, the benefits from these powerful approaches has been somewhat diminished and adoption has been inhibited. However, with the continued improvements in computing and instrumentation, the ability to translate complex models using large systems of equations from predictive roles to ones that are more integrated within therapeutic and novel imaging frameworks is becoming a rapid reality. Model-embedded systems designed to enable novel soft-tissue quantitative imaging and surgical applications are an excellent example of these efforts. The paradigm suggested in our work is that intervention itself is as patient-specific as the data that guides. More specifically, we assert that patient-specific therapies are not limited to being guided by the collection of patient-specific data (e.g. imaging, biomarkers, physiological variables, etc.) but rather they represent a dynamic patient-specific relationship between presentation, measurement technology, computation, and therapeutic approach. This is a paradigm that challenges convention and shifts patient care to diverse collaborative teams whereby patients, engineers, scientists, and physicians select the optimal combination of technologies to treat based on presentation and therapeutic goals. In this talk, examples of these dynamic subject-specific characterization and therapeutic frameworks will be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
30
September
2014
12:00pm
Dr. Shane Hutso
Vanderbilt University
Imaging, Image Analysis, and Optical Manipulation of Cellular Mechanics in Early Embryogenesis
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Wednesday
01
October
2014
12:00pm
Eliot McKinley
Vanderbilt University
Exploring the stem cell landscape in the normal colon and colon cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
12:00pm
Anna Sorace
Vanderbilt University
Vascular normalization in HER2+ breast cancer in a preclinical model
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
03
October
2014
1:00pm
Xiaoping Hu
Emory Unversity
Characterizing the Not-so-resting State of the Brain with fMRI   (more ...)
Characterizing the Not-so-resting State of the Brain with fMRI   (hide ...)

Resting state fMRI has become a widely used approach in assessing functional connectivity of the brain. To date, while most studies have assumed the resting state brain activity to be stationary, there is general consensus that it is non-stationary and dynamic. In the past few years, we have developed several approaches to characterize the dynamics in resting-state fMRI data and have found that 1) the resting-state hops between a number of quasistationary states and 2) the characteristics of these states and transitions between them can provide valuable measures of the brain. In addition, the different states can be considered as stationary for brain parcellation, providing more reproducible and more detailed segmentations. In this talk, I will describe the methods used to identify and characterize these states, the spatiotemporal features of these states and the application of state-specific parcellation to the segmentation of thalamus.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
06
October
2014
1:00pm
Baxter Rogers
Vanderbilt University
Journal Club on the topic of "Dynamic Changes in Functional Connectivity"
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
10
October
2014
1:00pm
Robert Barry
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
13
October
2014
1:00pm
Robert Barry
Vanderbilt University
Resting State Functional Connectivity in the Human Spinal Cord: Initial Results and Future Directions
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
15
October
2014
12:00pm
Stephanie Barnes
Vanderbilt University
Incorporating Patient Specific Treatment into Predictive Modeling of Breast Cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Anna Sorace
Vanderbilt University
Vascular normalization in HER2+ breast cancer in a preclinical model
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
17
October
2014
1:00pm
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
October
2014
1:00pm
Brett Byram
Vanderbilt University
Wait! You can see something in that ultrasound image?    (more ...)
Wait! You can see something in that ultrasound image?    (hide ...)

Ultrasound has experienced a recent explosion of new advances and techniques, and many of these techniques are already making their way into clinical practice. Despite the opportunity these advances provide, ultrasound exams still commonly result in suboptimal images or fail completely. (16-98% failure rate depending on the application). Methods exist to improve image quality, but they are not compatible with most of the new advances. In the BEAM Lab, we are developing strategies to improve image-quality that are consistent with both B-Mode and advanced ultrasound methods. We are particularly interested in doing this in ways that preserve image features that physicians and sonographers are trained to observe. In my talk I?ll briefly review some of the recent advances in ultrasound. Then I?ll describe how we?re using concepts from big data and new aperture-domain models of ultrasound propagation to improve ultrasound image quality. In my remaining time I?ll review some of the BEAM labs other work.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
28
October
2014
12:00pm
Dr. Paul Compagnola
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Imaging and Modeling the ECM in Ovarian Cancer
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Wednesday
29
October
2014
12:00pm
Nalin Leelatian
Vanderbilt University
Discovery and characterization of multiple stem-like cell populations in glioblastoma with mass cytometry
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
12:00pm
Kirsten Diggins
Vanderbilt University
ViSNE: Applying Dimensionality Reduction in Quantitative Imaging
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Thursday
30
October
2014
1:00pm
Joel Garbow
Washington University St. Louis
MRI at the Intersection of Basic and Clinical Science: Radiation Necrosis, Placental Function, and the Reverend Bayes
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
04
November
2014
11:45am
Andrew Gunn, MD
Interventional Radiology Fellow, Johns Hopkins University
Treatment response criteria in HCC after loco-regional therapy.   (more ...)
Treatment response criteria in HCC after loco-regional therapy.   (hide ...)

Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary malignancy of the liver. The ability to accurately characterize the response of hepatocellular carcinoma to the loco-regional therapies offered by the interventional radiologist with non-invasive imaging is of critical importance. The evolution of various imaging response criteria will be reviewed.
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
07
November
2014
1:00pm
Charles Coffey
Vanderbilt University
Clinical Medical Physics Graduate Programs at Vanderbilt   (more ...)
Clinical Medical Physics Graduate Programs at Vanderbilt   (hide ...)

Medical Physics education and training at Vanderbilt dates back to the 1950's. Since 1998, a Master of Science in Clinical Medial Physics (Therapy Physics and Diagnostic Physics tracks) has been offered. In 2008, a Professional Doctorate (DMP) in Clinical Medical Physics was approved by the School of Medicine. Presently, MSMP (Master of Science in Medical Physics) and DMP (Professional Doctorate in Medical Physics) Degrees are offered within the School of Medicine Graduate Programs. This presentation will provide an update of the current curriculum and training requirements of both the MSMP and DMP degrees. Although the focus of the Clinical Medical Physics Program for the past 15 years has been professional medical physics education and training, Program faculty have as a near-future goal to partner with the Graduate School to create a Clinical Medical Physicist Scientist PhD specialty pathway within the Department of Physics and Astronomy.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Monday
10
November
2014
1:00pm
Suzanne Avery
Vanderbilt University
Mapping structural connectivity of the BNST in humans
Neuroimaging Seminar, MCN CCC-1111
Tuesday
11
November
2014
12:00pm
Dr. H. Philip Stahl
SPIE, NASA
Rules for Optical Testing **Room Change: Light Hall 202 **
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202Light Hall 202
Wednesday
12
November
2014
12:00pm
David Hormuth
Vanderbilt University
A mechanically coupled reaction-diffusion model for predicting in vivo glioma growth
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202Light Hall 202
12:00pm
Lynn Samuelson
Vanderbilt University
Chemical probes as sensors of hepatocellular carcinoma detection in urine with BSI
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202Light Hall 202
Friday
14
November
2014
1:00pm
Ed Mojahed
Vanderbilt University
3D Echo Planar Chemical Shift Imaging: potentials and limitations   (more ...)
3D Echo Planar Chemical Shift Imaging: potentials and limitations   (hide ...)

585,720 (35%) of 1,665,540 cancer patients are estimated to die in the US in 2014 (American Cancer Society). Routine monitoring by PET, X-Ray, and CT scans are hazardous and evaluating the disease is time consuming. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Spectroscopy (MRS) have changed this routine significantly in the past few years. MRS can help with better understanding of tumor pathology, chemical compounds, and vascularization and it can even provide a predictive value for the treatment response and disease-free survival of patients (with some cancer subtypes) even before they start their treatment (Hattingen et al Neuroradiology 2008). Due to the fact that MRS studies are non-invasive and can provide vast amount of information about the disease, they can have a significant impact on patient's treatment choices, monitoring, prognosis, economics of their treatment plan, and the overall quality of life. Unfortunately, MRS is still not a common practice among the medical community. The three main reasons are as follows: First and far most is the fact that MRS acquisition is usually very time consuming. For a classic brain 1H 3D MRS with a spatial matrix of 20x18x10 with TR = 1000 ms, the scan time can be about 1 hour which is "practically" impossible. This is a more challenging issue for cancer patients who go through extensive chemotherapy and cannot tolerate long acquisition times of MRS or any other routine. Second, MR time is extremely expensive. Depending on the site, specific procedure, and strength of the magnetic field, a simple MR study can cost somewhere between 1000 to 3500 dollars (Economics of MRI report). Finally, non-standardized MRS acquisitions and analysis protocols could create havoc in interpretation and usefulness of the technique. MRS scan parameters such as spatial resolution and echo times have been used non-uniformly in variety of different combinations in research and clinical studies. These parameters must be chosen with utmost care as they have direct impact on signal to noise ratio, quantification of the metabolites, and an overall interpretation of the results. In addition, any MR center has to have experts who could accurately and reliably setup, acquire, and analyze the spectroscopy procedures. For the reasons said, having a method that could shorten the length of an MRS scan, reduce the cost, and potentially become a sensible routine in clinical practice is of a huge value. 3D Echo Planar Chemical Shift Imaging (3D EPSI) is a fast MRS technique that can achieve all that was mentioned above. Relative to an hour that takes for a classic 3D CSI brain scan (with above parameters), 3D EPSI could acquire the same sequence in 3 minute, of course with some limitations. This talk will give an overview of 3D EPSI pulse sequence design, application, limitations, as well as experiments with non-water suppressed 3D EPSI data analyzed in FSL.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
17
November
2014
1:00pm
Zhaohua Ding
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Exploring the dark matter of functional brain with functional tensor imaging
neruoimaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
21
November
2014
1:00pm
Swati Rane
Vanderbilt University
Understanding Parkinson's pathology with MRI   (more ...)
Understanding Parkinson's pathology with MRI   (hide ...)

The progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized pathologically by neurodegenerative changes in the basal ganglia and cortex, correlating with advancing motor and cognitive deficits. In this study, we sought to determine if structural changes in the cortex, measured by cortical thickness, mirror the proposed pathophysiologic model of cortical PD progression. We assessed if PD patients with well-defined motor phenotypes are distinguished by patterns of cortical atrophy. We calculated rates of cortical atrophy as a function of increasing age and advancing disease duration. Patients with predominant gait symptoms had atrophy in cortical regions susceptible to advancing disease. We detected early orbitofrontal and insular changes, followed by widespread posterior cortical atrophy is a PD-specific pattern, which should allow us to guide development of future biomarkers quantifying disease severity and progression. This study is our first attempt to understand PD progression in the cortex.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
28
November
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar (Thanksgiving)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
01
December
2014
1:00pm
Vicky Morgan
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
It's not as easy as it looks: Confounds in resting state functional connectivity   (more ...)
It's not as easy as it looks: Confounds in resting state functional connectivity   (hide ...)

Vicky will be going to go over *parts* of two recent papers. First, the paper by Rasmus Birn compares physiological noise correction methodologies in 25 subjects scanned twice on the same day and once three months later. He looks at the effect of physiological noise correction on inter-subject and intra-subject variability. Second, she will discuss some interesting ideas presented by Erik Beall regarding slice-wise vs. volume-wise motion
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
02
December
2014
12:00pm
Dr. Ed Gooding or Dr. Jason McClure
Princeton Instruments
TBA
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Wednesday
03
December
2014
12:00pm
Jie Zhao
Vanderbilt University
Mapping Tumor Cell Sensitivity and Resilience to Targeted Therapy from 2D to 3D
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
12:00pm
Jennifer Whisenant
Vanderbilt University
A Multisite Comparison of Quantitative MRI Data of the Breast
cancerImaging_seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
05
December
2014
1:00pm
Chad Quarles
Vanderbilt University
Probing the Microstructural and Vascular Features of Brain Tumors   (more ...)
Probing the Microstructural and Vascular Features of Brain Tumors   (hide ...)

With advanced contrast agent based MRI methods multiple physiologic and microstructural features of brain tumors can be simultaneously assessed. In this presentation I will discuss the pre-clinical and clinical development of these methods, their use in evaluating brain tumor treatment response and their translation into clinical practice.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
08
December
2014
1:00pm
Tim Hohman
Vanderbilt Memory and Alzheimer's Center
Imaging Genetics and Alzheimer's Disease: Building Models of Resilience.
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
12
December
2014
1:00pm
Jeff Carr
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
17
December
2014
12:00pm
David Smith
Vanderbilt University
DCEMRI.jl: A Fast, Validated Toolkit for Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Analysis
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Nate Semmineh
Vanderbilt University
Cell size imaging via DSC-MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
19
December
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar (Winter Break)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
December
2014
1:00pm
No Seminar (Winter Break)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
05
January
2015
1:00pm
Stephan Heckers
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
09
January
2015
1:00pm
Arthur Fleischer, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Clinical Applications of Contrast Enhanced Sonography   (more ...)
Clinical Applications of Contrast Enhanced Sonography   (hide ...)

This overview will cover the clinical applications of contrast enhanced sonography including liver lesion, renal mass, and ovarian mass diagnosis, potential application of targeted microbubbles and therapeutic applications.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
12
January
2015
1:00pm
Kimberly Albert
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
16
January
2015
1:00pm
Bruce Damon, PhD
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
19
January
2015
1:00pm
Wellington Pham
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
21
January
2015
12:00pm
Matthew McKenna
Vanderbilt University
Prediction of Tumor Response to Cytotoxic Therapy in vitro
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Ashley Stokes
Vanderbilt University
Exploring the links between obesity and brain cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
23
January
2015
1:00pm
Seth Smith, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Spinal Cord Imaging in 2015: Is it important?   (more ...)
Spinal Cord Imaging in 2015: Is it important?   (hide ...)

Developments in spinal cord MRI have lagged behind similar developments in the brain for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are related more to the thought process of MRI development rather than pragmatic or sequence design hurdles. For example, expecting well-conceived and thoroughly studied brain MRI sequences to perform equally well in the thoracic spinal cord at the level of the heart offers an opportunity for disappointment. Alternatively, the demands for high-resolution complicate the challenge of spinal cord imaging, especially as it pertains to quantitative MRI. Clinically, the spinal cord 1) is thought/shown to be involved in many neurodegenerative diseases, 2) is one of the most relevant targets for understanding neurodegenerative disease genesis and evolution, 3) is an approachable target for disease modifying therapies or intervention, 4) is one of the most important structures in providing quality of life functions (walking, standing, bowel/bladder function, sexual function), and 5) when damaged, the results are immediately and potentially, permanently manifest. It is clear that developing novel MRI methods to assess these aspects of spinal cord damage is important to the clinical community, but it is less clear how to appropriately achieve this. The goal of my presentation is to discuss what the spinal cord is, what it does, how it is clinically assessed, and the role it plays in diseases of the central nervous system. I will also provide my take on the existing MRI knowledge and technique gaps/challenges, and end with a discussion of what are some of the new imaging methods that are available that could provide an opportunity for an improved understanding of spinal cord disease and damage.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
26
January
2015
1:00pm
Hakmook Kang
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Monday
02
February
2015
1:00pm
Zhaoyue Shi
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Dynamic changes in fMRI resting-state connectivity
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
06
February
2015
1:00pm
Hollis G. Potter, MD
Hospital for Special Surgery
The MRI Lab at HSS: Preclinical (and clinical) Orthopaedic Research in a Clinical Environment - From parametric mapping to imaging around metal   (more ...)
The MRI Lab at HSS: Preclinical (and clinical) Orthopaedic Research in a Clinical Environment - From parametric mapping to imaging around metal   (hide ...)

Recent developments in parametric mapping have enabled the non-invasive interrogation of articular cartilage, fibrocartilage, and ligament, yielding independent assessment of collagen orientation and proteoglycan. This has improved the ability to assess tissue engineered constructs as well as provide preliminary data correlating to functional capacity of soft tissue. The utility of such imaging in a clinic is largely to investigate cohorts at risk for development of early osteoarthritis such as hip femoroacetabular impingement, but also to assess to the efficacy of the cartilage repair using either scaffold or cell based constructs. Despite surgical interventions and these tissue repair techniques, the incident of joint replacement as a treatment for end stage osteoarthritis is increasing. To that end, techniques that reduce susceptibility artifact and generate clinically relevant data around orthopedic implants are necessary. Data will be presented demonstrating the utility of MRI as a biomarker in assessing adverse tissue to reaction to implants.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
09
February
2015
1:00pm
Tristan Watkins
Vanderbilt University
Detecting the neural changes associated with obesity
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
13
February
2015
1:00pm
Manus Donahue, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative perfusion and oxygen extraction measures in the clinic   (more ...)
Quantitative perfusion and oxygen extraction measures in the clinic   (hide ...)

My work has focused on development and application of new imaging approaches for studying brain function in health and disease. These methods are sensitive to physiological parameters such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, pH, oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, parameters that may adjust prior to symptom expression and irreversible tissue damage in many diseases. We have added these methods to existing clinical imaging protocols at Vanderbilt and elsewhere to investigate functional changes in brain tumors, steno-occlusive carotid artery disease, Alzheimer's disease, acute ischemic stroke, post-stroke plasticity, Moyamoya disease and multiple sclerosis. During this talk, I will present an overview of how these methods work, and also how they are being used in clinical trials at Vanderbilt.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
February
2015
1:00pm
Dylan Burnette, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Studying actomyosin contractile systems with super-resolution microscopy   (more ...)
Studying actomyosin contractile systems with super-resolution microscopy   (hide ...)

The generation of contractile forces inside a cell is a major driver of processes such as cell migration, cell division. These contractile forces are generated by the molecular motor non-muscle myosin II (NMII). NMII is a hexamer consisting of 2 heavy chains, 2 essential light chains, and 2 regulatory light chains. A NMII hexamer can interact with other myosin II hexamers via their heavy chains, to form a bipolar filament. In this filament, the N-terminal motor domains are pointed in opposite directions, with the C-terminal coiled-coil rod domains linking the two molecules. In this orientation, NMII can grab onto and contract anti-parallel actin filaments, resulting in force generation. NMII filament formation has been well characterized, and importantly, only 15-30 NMII hexamers may associate with each other before steric hindrance blocks addition of more hexamers. How NMII filaments form into large arrays of adjacent filaments, referred to as stacks capable of generating increasing amounts of force however, is much less well understood. This is partly due to the fact that NMII filaments are diffraction limited, and thus little dynamic information can be gleamed from conventional microscopy. Here, we use a classic model of mesenchymal migration, U2OS cells, combined with structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which allows us to resolve the motor and rod domains of NMII, to show how stacks arise. We first noticed that NMII filaments are found in a number of different organizations in fixed cells at their leading edge. We found NMII filaments in what we are referring to as 2 motor groups, 3 motor groups, 4 motor groups, and more than 4 motor groups organization, based on the number of motor domain groups we can resolve with SIM. We hypothesized that individual NMII hexamers could be walking along actin filaments and physically pulling themselves out of an initial filament to expand into a stack. To probe this hypothesis, we turned to live cell SIM, which revealed that NMII filaments were indeed expanding from an initial 2 motor filament, with asymmetric growth on one side of the filament, followed by temporally by growth on the opposite side of the filament. We thus sought to confirm this observation by perturbing the system with pharmacological agents. We treated cells with increasing amounts of blebbistatin ? a specific and potent inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity? and quantified the change in NMII filament organization vs untreated cells. We have seen a decrease in the percent of NMII species in the 3 motor, 4 motor, and 4+ motor group organizations in blebbistatin treated cells. Interestingly however, we also noticed that even in saturating concentrations of blebbistatin (i.e., 50 ?m) filament formation seems unperturbed. This has led us to hypothesize that NMII stack formation (i.e., 4 motor and 4+ motor group organizations) is more sensitive than filament formation (i.e., 2 motor group) to changes in myosin II ATPase activity.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
February
2015
1:00pm
Visar Belegu, PhD
John Hopkins University
Structural and functional imaging in patients with chronic spinal cord injury   (more ...)
Structural and functional imaging in patients with chronic spinal cord injury   (hide ...)

Spinal cord is a conduit for the exchange of information between the brain and the body, and damage to specific spinal cord tracts disrupts conduction of sensory and motor signals across the lesion epicenter. Noninvasive visualization of these tracts with imaging techniques that are sensitive to the integrity of the spinal cord tissue has been achieved with some success. Particularly, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)- and magnetization transfer (MT)-derived quantities have shown promise in assessing tissue health in the central nervous system. However, there are significant technical challenges (size, low signal-to-noise, and motion) in using quantitative MRI methods to assess spinal cord integrity, and a spinal cord injury, traumatic or non-traumatic in etiology, adds to these challenges. We are using DTI-derived parameters (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and parallel and perpendicular eigenvalues), and MT-weighted signal intensity relative to cerebrospinal fluid (MTCSF) to assess tract specific integrity patients that are living with a chronic spinal cord injury; in addition, we are correlating these imaging parameters with neurological function as defined by the motor and sensory components of the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). Furthermore, we aim to understand the salient cortical changes that occur as a consequence to spinal cord injury as well as in response to therapeutic interventions. To accomplish this, we are utilizing resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) since it allows us to study functional networks using an identical protocol for all patients, regardless of cognitive or physical limitations. Functional connectivity between sensorimotor and visual networks is particularly interesting in this regard as it seems to be important in neurological recovery. Our long-term goal is to understand the relationship between the structural and functional noninvasive imaging parameters and neurological function, and using these parameters to optimize functional recovery.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
02
March
2015
1:00pm
Maureen McHugo
Vanderbilt University
Evaluation of hippocampal hyperactivity in schizophrenia using resting state fMRI
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
04
March
2015
12:00pm
Jared Weis
Vanderbilt University
Modeling the biomechanics of breast cancer
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Jack Skinner
Vanderbilt University
Multi-echo DSC MRI for estimating vascular permeability
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Monday
09
March
2015
1:00pm
Isabel Gauthier
Vanderbilt University
Individual differences in face recognition ability and its relationship to FFA selectivity
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
13
March
2015
1:00pm
Christian Beaulieu, PhD
University of Alberta
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
16
March
2015
1:00pm
Katherine Swett
Vanderbilt Brain Institute
Functional Networks of Adolescent Reading Comprehension Ability
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
18
March
2015
12:00pm
Lisa Li
Vanderbilt University
A model-weighted DCE-MRI method
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Katherine Jameson
Vanderbilt University
Quantifying Response Heterogeneity for Biomarker and Target Discovery in NSCLC
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
20
March
2015
1:00pm
Alex Smith
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
23
March
2015
1:00pm
Pratik Talati
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
27
March
2015
1:00pm
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
30
March
2015
1:00pm
Benjamin Conrad
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Structural Covariance Analysis Using Standard T1's: Methods and Application in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
01
April
2015
12:00pm
Sudheer Rani
Vanderbilt University
MR and PET compatible Hollow Fiber Bioreactor for monitoring tumor growth and treatment response
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Kelly Gardner
Vanderbilt University
Tracking chemotherapy response in brain tumors using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
03
April
2015
1:00pm
Jorge Gamboa
Vanderbilt University
Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease   (more ...)
Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease   (hide ...)

There is strong evidence that oxidative stress and inflammation correlate with morbidity and mortality in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be the cause of both oxidative stress and inflammation, which also could lead to protein and energy wasting in ESRD. Previous studies have shown that patients with ESRD on maintenance hemodialysis exhibit mitochondrial abnormalities in peripheral blood mono-nuclear cells and ultra-structural abnormalities in skeletal muscle compared to healthy individuals. We also have previously shown that patients with ESRD present lower mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lower mitochondrial volume density in skeletal muscle compared to healthy individuals. Methods and approaches to measure mitochondrial dysfunction in humans will be discussed, including 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which has been considered the ?gold standard? to measure mitochondrial function in vivo.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
06
April
2015
1:00pm
Ronald Cowan
Vanderbilt University
Ecstasy, Molly and the brain: neuroimaging of MDMA toxicity
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
10
April
2015
1:00pm
Todd Peterson, PhD
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
15
April
2015
12:00pm
Jason Williams
Vanderbilt University
PET-CT of therapy response in advanced melanoma
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
12:00pm
Noor Tantawy
Vanderbilt University
In vivo imaging of breast tumor microcalcifications using bone-seeking agents
cancerImaging_seminar, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
17
April
2015
1:00pm
Robert Ogg, PhD
St. Jude's Hospital
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
April
2015
1:00pm
David Smith, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Recent Developments in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction, and Postprocessing   (more ...)
Recent Developments in MRI Acquisition, Reconstruction, and Postprocessing   (hide ...)

Cartesian MRI acquisitions and vanilla inverse FFT reconstructions are so 2006. I will discuss some new developments in MRI acquisitions, iterative reconstructions, and the postprocessing workflow. Topics will include our work in continuous moving table golden angle radial imaging, multiple instantaneous switchable scans, low-redundancy Cartesian imaging, sparse and low rank methods, and rapid postprocessing with open source, reproducible results.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
27
April
2015
1:00pm
Blythe Corbett, Ph.D.
Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
29
April
2015
12:00pm
Matthew Hight
Vanderbilt University
Development of Molecular Imaging Strategies for Mitochondrial Dependent Metabolic and Cell Death Pathways
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
12:00pm
Xiaoyu Jiang
Vanderbilt University
In vivo detection of apoptosis in tumor response to treatment using temporal diffusion spectroscopy
cancerImaging_seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
01
May
2015
1:00pm
Kim Butts, Ph.D.
Stanford University
MRgFUS in the Brain: From Ablation to Neuromodulation   (more ...)
MRgFUS in the Brain: From Ablation to Neuromodulation   (hide ...)

Ultrasound can be focused to a point deep in the brain through the intact skull, without damage to intervening tissues. This is being investigated in the treatment of essential tremor and other neurological disorders. Our work focuses on using beam simlulations for treatment planning, optimizing imaging methods such as MR thermometry for monitoring, MR-ARFI for targeting, and UTE MR for phase aberration correction, and investigating ultrasound-based neuromodulation without a temperature rise.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
04
May
2015
1:00pm
TBA
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
08
May
2015
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
11
May
2015
1:00pm
Laura Dugan
Vanderbilt University
Developing Imaging Strategies for Inflammatory Pathway Activation in Aging and Disease
Neuroimaging Seminar, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
05
June
2015
12:00am
No Seminar until Fall 2015
Check back here for details!
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
24
June
2015
1:00pm
Corin Miller
Merck Research Labs
Dissertation Defense   (more ...)
Dissertation Defense   (hide ...)

Non-Invasive Measurements of Hepatic Glycogen Levels and Glycogen Synthesis using Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer and Comparison to 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
25
June
2015
8:45am
VUIIS Retreat at Vanderbilt Student Law School
Sponsored by: Vanderbilt Medical Alumni Association
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
28
August
2015
1:00pm
Alfredo Rodriguez
Autonomouse Metropolitan University, Mexico
Cutoff-free travelling wave MR Imaging   (more ...)
Cutoff-free travelling wave MR Imaging   (hide ...)

The use of travelling waves has been successfully implemented to generate magnetic resonance images (MRI) at 7 T using whole-body systems. With this approach, samples with larger fields of view can be imaged using conventional RF coils and waveguides with different cross-sections. One of the significant limitations is the specific cutoff frequency, determined by the bore which can be higher than most Larmor frequencies commonly in use for MR imaging and spectroscopy today. To overcome this limitation a parallel-plate waveguide was employed because its cut-off frequency is zero for the lowest-order transverse magnetic mode so all frequencies can propagate. In this talk, we will review some of these recents results and discuss some possible further works.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
04
September
2015
1:00pm
Jack Noble
VU Electrical Engineering/VISE
Image analysis-based guidance and decision support for cochlear implant interventions   (more ...)
Image analysis-based guidance and decision support for cochlear implant interventions   (hide ...)

With over 320,000 cochlear implant (CI) recipients worldwide, CIs have become arguably the most successful neural prostheses to date and are considered standard of care treatment for severe hearing loss. CIs use an array of electrodes surgically implanted into the cochlea to stimulate auditory nerve fibers and induce the sensation of hearing. While CIs have been remarkably successful, a significant number of CI recipients still experience poor speech understanding. Collaborative research being done at Vanderbilt has demonstrated that image-guidance and image-analysis technologies have the potential to significantly improve this intervention by addressing two factors thought to contribute to poorer outcomes -- surgical trauma and sub-optimal positioning of the CI. Novel image analysis techniques we have developed facilitate using patient CT images to perform: (1) CI surgery simulation and planning in the pre-operative phase, (2) intra-operative guidance for reduced trauma and more precise placement of the CI, and (3) selection of customized CI processor settings that address sub-optimal positioning of the device and significantly improve hearing outcomes over the standard-of-care approach. The presentation will review results from our most recent studies, current challenges, and planned directions for future research.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
11
September
2015
1:00pm
No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
September
2015
12:00pm
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
TBD
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
18
September
2015
1:00pm
Henry Zhu
VUIIS
Connecting neurotransmitters to resting-state functional connectivity at 7T   (more ...)
Connecting neurotransmitters to resting-state functional connectivity at 7T   (hide ...)

Advancing MRSI from 3T to 7T provides more than doubled spectral resolution that is uniquely advantageous compared to most MRI metrics. At 7T, we shift the focus from mapping Cho, Cr and NAA to the primary excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate (Glu) and its precursor glutamine (Gln). The Glu-Gln cycle consists of the release of Glu by neurons, its conversion to Gln in astrocytes and subsequent transport back to neurons. The energy consumed by these activities may be associated with the increase of BOLD signal at the locations of Glu release and conversion. As this process is central to sustaining the functions of the brain, its efficacy can potentially be used as an indicator of biological processes such as aging or the development of neurodegenerative diseases. For the first time, we conducted correlated MRSI and resting-state fMRI exams in a group of healthy volunteers to explore the experimental capabilities and post-processing framework to investigate this cycle. In this seminar, we describe our current effort and present an outlook of anticipated developments and possible applications.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
September
2015
1:00pm
Saikat Sengupta
VUIIS
Continuous Moving Table MRI at 3 Tesla   (more ...)
Continuous Moving Table MRI at 3 Tesla   (hide ...)

MRI of the whole body is of interest in many clinical studies including whole-body fat?water quantification, peripheral vascular angiography and detection of cancer metastasis. Continuously Moving Table (CMT) MRI is a high throughput technique that achieves rapid whole body imaging with distinct advantages over the traditional multistation approach to whole body MRI. The goal of our work here is develop a suite of CMT MRI techniques based on golden angle (111.246o azimuthal step, GA) radial sampling at 3 Tesla. GA sampling provides total retrospective profile binning flexibility for arbitrary slice thickness reconstructions, not possible with previously reported Linear Angle (LA) radial or other cartesian CMT techniques. I will present results of GA versus LA radial CMT MRI at 3 Tesla and our application of CMT MRI in whole body fat/water quantification. I will also discuss methods to improve CMT fat/water MRI with continuous ?B0 shimming, and show results of dynamically shimmed whole body MRI acquired in 90 seconds. Finally I will discuss most recent work on developing PROPELLER CMT MRI as a stepping stone to performing T2 weighted moving table scans.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
02
October
2015
1:00pm
Paula Donahue
VU Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Imaging lymphatic structure and function   (more ...)
Imaging lymphatic structure and function   (hide ...)

The lymphatic system is part of the circulatory system and consists of a network of lymphatic vessels and nodes whose purpose is to maintain fluid balance, as well as to process and return capillary ultrafiltrate and plasma proteins back to the blood circulation. Lymphatic impairment is known to reduce quality of life in many crippling diseases of the 21st century, including obesity, lymphedema, and cancer. However, the lymphatics are not nearly as well-understood as other bodily systems, largely owing to a lack of sensitive imaging technologies that can be applied using standard clinical equipment. In this presentation, I will discuss breast cancer treatment-related lymphedema (BCRL), which is a lifelong, debilitating condition impacting a survivor's quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of BCRL and lymphatic dysfunction in breast cancer survivors, there are currently no accepted imaging methods for evaluating lymphatic function and evaluating therapy response. This presentation will review unmet clinic needs, the pathophysiology of BCRL, and the use of structural and functional imaging to test hypotheses regarding healthy and compromised lymphatic systems, early detection of BCRL onset and the efficacy of commonly used therapeutic interventions.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
05
October
2015
12:00pm
Eric R. Tkaczyk, M.D., Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Emerging Diagnostic Optical Technologies for Dermatology   (more ...)
Emerging Diagnostic Optical Technologies for Dermatology   (hide ...)

Optical engineering has seen revolutionary developments during past decades as evidenced by Nobel Prizes focused on light science and technology in Chemistry and Physics last year. For the application of new imaging techniques, the specialty of dermatology is particularly well-positioned. Accordingly, a large number of optical diagnostic products have recently emerged on the market to assist dermatologists in their clinical decision-making. The possibilities and pitfalls of these various technologies stem from the fundamentally different underlying physical principles. This discussion will provide a broad overview of both the principles and present state of clinical art for four of the seven major noninvasive optical techniques being advanced for dermatology today.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
09
October
2015
1:00pm
Adrienne Dula
VUIIS
OctoberCEST: A Celebration of Magnetization Exchange (and reflections on being the first trainee in VUIIS)   (more ...)
OctoberCEST: A Celebration of Magnetization Exchange (and reflections on being the first trainee in VUIIS)   (hide ...)

Quantitative MRI measures have the ability to directly relate MR signal characteristics to tissue properties. MR techniques to assess saturation transfer within tissue including chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) was developed and optimized for application in human pathology. As CEST is a relatively new MRI contrast approach targeting exchangeable protons instead of those in water, this noninvasive molecular sensitivity is significant. Using simulation-driven parameter choices we created clinically relevant imaging protocols.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
12
October
2015
12:00pm
Xingde Li, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Label-free Optical Micro Imaging of Tissue Histology in vivo
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
16
October
2015
1:00pm
No Seminar (Fall Break)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
October
2015
1:00pm
Dan Perrien
VU Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation
Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Imaging opportunities on the road to treating a rare disease   (more ...)
Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva: Imaging opportunities on the road to treating a rare disease   (hide ...)

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is characterized by episodic and cumulative transformation of skeletal muscle to bone and is among the rarest genetic diseases. Hence, FOP patients experience progressive and permanent immobilization as their joints are fused by heterotopic bridges of bone. Since the discovery that FOP is caused by activating mutations in the Type 1 BMP receptor, Alk2, there has been a strong commercial interest in developing a treatment for FOP. However, the unpredictable episodic nature of FOP "flares" and the rarity of the disease present unusual challenges for study designs which require improved predictive and prognostic tools. FOP flares include stages of fibroproliferation, angiogenesis, and chondrogenesis that precede mineralization. Each of these processes may present diagnostic and/or prognostic opportunities for the application of existing or novel imaging methods.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
30
October
2015
1:00pm
Kirill Kovtunov
International Tomographic Center, Novosibirsk, Russia
NMR/MRI signal enhancement using parahydrogen: from mechanistic studies to medicine   (more ...)
NMR/MRI signal enhancement using parahydrogen: from mechanistic studies to medicine   (hide ...)

Nowadays parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) in heterogeneous hydrogenations has clearly proven its viability. While this sub-field of hyperpolarization in magnetic resonance is still in its infancy, at this point the demonstration that many types of heterogeneous catalysts have an intrinsic ability to produce PHIP is quite an important and encouraging achievement. Heterogeneous processes may have certain limitations, but they also have many advantages over their homogeneous counterparts. In this respect, PHIP appears to be a more direct way to catalyst-free hyperpolarized liquids and solutes production, and quite likely the only way to utilize parahydrogen to produce hyperpolarized gases. It is also expected that PHIP could become a useful tool in the mechanistic studies of heterogeneous catalytic processes.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
02
November
2015
12:00pm
Vasan Venugopalan, Sc.D.
University of California, Irvine
Laser-Generated Microtsunamis for Targeted Cell Lysis, Molecular Delivery and Mechanotransduction    (more ...)
Laser-Generated Microtsunamis for Targeted Cell Lysis, Molecular Delivery and Mechanotransduction    (hide ...)

Pulsed laser microbeam irradiation provides powerful tool for cell manipulation and modification due to its ability to deposit energy with high spatial localization. Often, such irradiation leads to plasma formation. Apart from free electron generation, plasma formation often results in local vaporization, shock wave emission, and cavitation bubble formation, expansion, and collapse. Our research has shown that when using nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses at visible and NIR wavelengths the stress waves produced by the cavitation bubble dynamics, which we term microtsunamis, are principally responsible for the resulting cellular effects. First, I will discuss the uses of laser-generated microtsunamis in standard applications of targeted cell lysis and optoporation. Second, I will provide results demonstrating the ability of laser-generated microtsunamis to stimulate cellular mechanotransduction and motivate potential applications for high throughput drug screening and basic biological studies. In both instances, I will illustrate the value of quantitative modeling as a means to connect the applied physical perturbations to cellular responses.

Bio: Vasan Venugopalan is Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science at the University of California, Irvine. He also holds joint appointments in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, and Beckman Laser Institute & Medical Clinic at UCI. His lab focuses on basic and applied research regarding the uses of pulsed laser microbeams in cell biology and biotechnology as well as the development of novel, open-source, computational tools to model light transport in cells and tissues. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers. He also serves Associate Editor of the OSA journals Optics Express (2009-present) and Biomedical Optics Express (2010-present).
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
06
November
2015
1:00pm
Eric Barth
VU Mechanical Engineering
Curing Epilepsy with an MRI Compatible Needle Steering Robot   (more ...)
Curing Epilepsy with an MRI Compatible Needle Steering Robot   (hide ...)

Minimally invasive treatments for various neurological diseases require precise needle tip placement and delivery of therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the feedback necessary for this level of precision. To achieve real-time guidance of a steerable needle using the image, a robotic platform is required to be MRI compatible. Additive manufacturing (3-D printing) presents an opportunity to design such a platform that is MRI compatible, intrinsically fail-safe, sterilizable, and low cost. A compact, non-magnetic robot employing pneumatic actuation and nonlinear control is presented that achieves this aim. Through the unique combination of MRI compatibility and curved needle trajectories, this robot provides access to the deep brain through a natural opening in the skull base, potentially eliminating the need for drilling of the skull for neurosurgery. Specifically, a novel approach to epilepsy treatment via a helical steerable needle inserted through the foramen ovale for the ablation of the hippocampus is presented. Proof-of-concept testing in a 3T scanner has indicated adequate precision and minimal image noise. Will Grissom of the VUIIS will also speak about challenges and progress in performing real-time MR thermometry around the curved needle and ablation probe.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
09
November
2015
12:00pm
Andrew Dunn, Ph.D.
Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Director of Center for Emerging Imaging Technologies
University of Texas, Austin
Optical Tools for High Resolution Imaging of Cerebral Hemodynamics   (more ...)
Optical Tools for High Resolution Imaging of Cerebral Hemodynamics   (hide ...)

During ischemic stroke, oxygen delivery in interrupted to a region of the brain resulting in a complex cascade of hemodynamic and cellular events that ultimately leads to cell death and tissue damage. Although recent advances in high resolution in vivo imaging have enabled some aspects of this cascade to be visualized dynamically, the detailed changes in blood flow and oxygenation during stroke remain poorly understood. This talk will describe two new developments in optical imaging techniques for high resolution imaging of cortical hemodynamics and their application to animal models of stroke and clinical translation to neurosurgery. The first, laser speckle contrast imaging, enables real-time visualization of blood flow during neurosurgery, monitoring of clot formation in animal models of stroke, and chronic tracking of blood flow changes to assess recovery from brain injury. The second, two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy, allows determination of oxygen levels in single, subsurface blood vessels with three-dimensional micron scale resolution. When combined together, these imaging methods provide unprecedented levels of in vivo information about the microvascular alterations in the brain following diseases such as stroke.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
13
November
2015
1:00pm
Bennett Landman
VU Electrical Engineering/VUIIS
BigData Neuroimage Processing: Combining algorithm innovation with software-as-a-service   (more ...)
BigData Neuroimage Processing: Combining algorithm innovation with software-as-a-service   (hide ...)

Big data offer an opportunity to study specific control populations (age / sex / demographics / genetics) and identify substantive homogeneous sub-cohorts so that one may understand the role that individual factors play in treatment response. Millions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) images on hundred of thousands of individuals are currently stored our radiology archives. Worldwide, these data files are estimated to constitute one-third of global storage demand, but are effectively trapped on storage media. Neuroscience / neuroimaging studies now produce an abundance of imaging data, but generate a poverty of context with which to analyze data and drive discovery. At VUIIS, we have been driving innovation in medical image high performance computing, reusability of image processing software, and robust algorithms for segmentation. Today, we will present case studies in diffusion tensor imaging, whole brain segmentation, and cortical surface estimation.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
November
2015
1:00pm
Will Grissom
VUIIS
Rethinking Parallel Transmit MRI   (more ...)
Rethinking Parallel Transmit MRI   (hide ...)

Parallel radiofrequency (RF) pulse transmission using multiple RF coils promises to prospectively eliminate image artifacts due to field inhomogeneities, enable sophisticated reduced-FOV imaging schemes, and even improve patient safety. It is considered essential at ultra-high field strengths of 7 Tesla and above, and two-channel parallel transmit is now standard on flagship 3T scanners. However, despite having been first proposed about 15 years ago, it has yet to realize its full potential, beyond producing minor gains in transmit RF field uniformity. This are several reasons for this, including the difficulty of scaling up the number of high power transmit channels to reach the large numbers of channels enjoyed by parallel receive, the large computational demand of designing patient-tailored parallel RF pulses and ensuring their safety while the patient lies in the scanner, and a lack of suitable parallel transmit coil arrays. In this talk I will present our group?s recent efforts to alleviate these roadblocks by rethinking how parallel coils are designed and related to their amplifiers, and whether we actually need to model MR physics when designing patient-tailored parallel pulses.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
November
2015
1:00pm
No Seminar (Thanksgiving)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
30
November
2015
12:00pm
Madan Jagasia, M.D.
Vanderbilt University
TBD
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
04
December
2015
1:00pm
Charles Manning
VUIIS
Novel Precision Imaging Diagnostics of Cancer
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
09
December
2015
10:00am
Aliya Gifford
Department of Chemical and Physical Biology
MRI Characterization of Brown Adipose Tissue in Adult Humans with Validation by PET-CT
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
Friday
11
December
2015
1:00pm
Jacob Houghton
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Strategies for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer   (more ...)
Strategies for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of pancreatic cancer   (hide ...)

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most devastating forms of cancer and it will soon be the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, surpassing both breast and colorectal cancer. Over the next decade advances in the fields of molecular imaging and nuclear medicine will be critical for improving the outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer. Dr. Houghton?s research takes a multi-faceted approach to the development of radiopharmaceuticals for a number of applications, including: anatomical localization of premalignant and cancerous lesions, molecularly targeted radiotherapeutics, optical imaging probes for image-guided surgery, as well as companion diagnostics for chemo-, radio-, and immunotherapy. In his presentation, Dr. Houghton will discuss the development of molecular imaging probes ? both PET and optical ? that target pancreatic cancer biomarkers and their assessment in advanced preclinical models of pancreatic cancer. Additionally, he will discuss progress in the preclinical development of radioimmunotherapy strategies for pancreatic cancer.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
December
2015
12:00pm
Mark Canales
Field Applications Specialist (Life Science)
Spectroscopy Products Division
Introduction to bio-Raman applications: cells, tissues and diagnostics   (more ...)
Introduction to bio-Raman applications: cells, tissues and diagnostics   (hide ...)

Abstract: Raman microscopy has become a routine tool for many materials, but the need for this molecular imaging and analysis technique in biological research has become essential. The ability to probe the chemical and molecular structure of biological materials is obtained directly without the need for any dyes or markers. These systems can be utilized to generate chemical images of cells, tissue, bone and bio-compatible materials with very high spatial resolution. It has been employed for cancer diagnosis, stem cell differentiation, skin treatments, protein structure analysis, bio-diagnostics, and bacterial identification. This Raman instrumentation can also be combined with environmental chambers, scanning probe techniques, scanning electron microscopes and in-vivo probes; to provide in-situ and co-localized measurements. This talk will provide an introduction to Raman microscopy with biological materials; the instrumentation required for these techniques; and, will highlight some applications where Raman microscopy is making the biggest impact with biological materials.
Bio: Mark Canales is a Life Science Application Scientist with Renishaw?s Raman Spectroscopy division. He joined Renishaw/Renishaw Diagnostics in 2012 with over 15 years of industry experience in applications scientific support, technical support training, and project management. Prior to working at Renishaw, Mark was a Senior Scientist supporting GE Healthcare?s Genomics/CodeLink Microarray portfolio. Mark has held Senior Application Scientist?s roles at Aperio (Leica), Amersham Biosciences, and Molecular Dynamics.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
18
December
2015
1:00pm
No Seminar (Winter Break)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
25
December
2015
1:00pm
No Seminar (Happy Holidays!)
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
08
January
2016
1:00pm
Frank Tong
Vanderbilt University
Characterizing visual and attentional processes throughout the human visual pathway   (more ...)
Characterizing visual and attentional processes throughout the human visual pathway   (hide ...)

In this talk, I will describe some fMRI work from my lab characterizing how basic features (e.g., orientation) and complex objects are represented at multiple levels of the human visual system. Although the primary visual cortex (V1) is commonly thought to be the site where orientation selectivity emerges, we find evidence of coarse orientation selectivity in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Further experiments show that the strength of feature-selective responses in the LGN can be modulated by visual attention, as well as by the surrounding visual context. In the second part of this talk, I will describe some analytic methods and approaches that my lab has developed using multivariate pattern analysis and voxel-based encoding models to characterize the representations of visual stimuli and how these representations can be flexibly modified by attentional feedback. Questions and open discussion of these and related analytic approaches are welcome.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
January
2016
1:00pm
Junzhong Xu
VUIIS
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
22
January
2016
1:00pm
Lori Arlinghaus Davis
Cancelled due to snow storm!
Vanderbilt University
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
29
January
2016
1:00pm
Reed Omary, M.D., M.S.
CME Accredited Lecture
Vanderbilt University
How to Jumpstart a Research-Based Academic Career   (more ...)
How to Jumpstart a Research-Based Academic Career   (hide ...)

In this talk, Dr. Omary will discuss several key tactics to jumpstarting academic research careers. These include: a) collaborating with successful existing research teams; b) developing a niche; and c) targeting specific outcome measures of success. Concrete examples of each approach will be discussed, as well as some of the ways that successful researchers think about their overall strategies.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
05
February
2016
1:00pm
Daniel Claasen
Vanderbilt University, Dept of Neurology
Impulsive-Compulsive Behaviors in Parknson's Disease   (more ...)
Impulsive-Compulsive Behaviors in Parknson's Disease   (hide ...)

Motor symptoms in Parkinson?s disease (PD) are effectively managed by dopamine-based therapies, yet behavioral changes in patients can arise as an unintended consequence. Symptoms characterized by persistent participation in reward-driven activities result in significant morbidity to patients and caregivers. The descriptive term for these symptoms, impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICB), captures the aberrant, goal-directed, decision-making phenomenology typified in this clinical condition. Symptoms range from hypersexuality to compulsive eating, gambling, shopping, and excessive participation in certain hobbies. Impulsive and compulsive behaviors are more commonly manifest in patients taking dopamine agonist therapy, and behaviors can abate with reduction or discontinuation of their use. This talk will be comprised of three parts: the clinical presentation and importance of Dopamine Agonist use, description of medication-induced behavioral changes linked to mesocorticolimbic network, and a review of recent findings describing distinct functional brain changes in patients with ICB (with emphasis on cerebral blood flow, D2-like receptor PET imaging, and BOLD signal changes).
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
12
February
2016
1:00pm
Mike Nickels
Vanderbilt University
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
19
February
2016
1:00pm
John Gore
CME Accredited Lecture
Vanderbilt University
Bogus Science: an imaging perspective   (more ...)
Bogus Science: an imaging perspective   (hide ...)

Bogus Science is not the same as bad science. It connotes acts of volition that are intended to persuade people that something is true and supported by scientific evidence when such ?truths? are actually bogus. We classify Bogus Science in 4 categories: (i) pseudoscience (ii) fraudulent science (iii) pathological science and (iv) corrupted science. There are innumerable examples of each of these that have arisen historically and are pervasive today. Each can be illustrated by examples taken from radiology and medical imaging. Understanding and appreciating some of the pitfalls of Bogus Science is essential for educating the public and maintaining professional ethics.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
2:00pm
Pooja Gaur
Chemical and Physical Biology Program
Advancements in MRI Temperature Map Reconstruction for Real-Time Guidance of Thermal Therapies
William Grissom, Ph.D., Advisor
Dissertation Defense, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
26
February
2016
1:00pm
Dan Brown
Interventional Oncology
Locoregional Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Optimizing the Gold Standard   (more ...)
Locoregional Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Optimizing the Gold Standard   (hide ...)

Most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) are unresectable at diagnosis due to underlying cirrhosis of the liver. The incidence of HCC is increasing rapidly in the United States. These patients can only be cured with liver transplantation. However the need for organs far outstrips supply and many patients have disease burdens too significant for transplantation. Interventional Oncology arterial treatments with chemoembolization or Yttrium-90 radioembolization along with thermal ablation are the gold standard to bridge patients to transplant or as definitive therapy. During this presentation, the history and techniques guiding these procedures will be reviewed. Additionally, opportunities to optimize outcomes will be discussed, including serum and imaging biomarkers as well as intra-procedural monitoring and targeting.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
01
March
2016
4:00pm
Leon Bellan
Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering
3D Microfluidic Materials: Fabrication and Biomedical Applications
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
04
March
2016
1:00pm
Peter Konrad, MD, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Restoration of Standing and Walking with ISMS in Humans   (more ...)
Restoration of Standing and Walking with ISMS in Humans   (hide ...)

Spinal cord neural circuitry exists in the lumbar enlargement that makes it possible to stand and create synergistic, rhythmic stepping activity in the lower limbs. This circuitry has been described in the literature for nearly 100 years following the seminal works by Sherrington in 1910 and Graham Brown in 1911.  In the past 20 years, clinicians have tried to reengage such these circuits for standing and walking in the lower spinal cord of paralyzed humans through novel paradigms of physical therapy, pharmacological stimulation of the spinal cord, or recently ? epidural stimulation of the spinal cord5. Although standing and stepping with these maneuvers are rudimentary at best, these human studies offer promise to restore controlled, lower extremity movement to the spinal cord injured (SCI) individual. Evidence from animal data suggests that more focal activation of intraspinal circuitry (IntraSpinal Micro-Stimulation ? ISMS) would produce more fatigue resistant, natural standing and stepping activity in humans. To date, there has been no direct confirmation of such circuitry in the spinal cord of bipedal humans who have been paralyzed. Furthermore, mapping of such circuitry would provide the basis of a novel intraspinal neuroprosthetic that should be able to restore control of standing or walking in a manner that is much more physiologically normal and tolerable than by stimulating each individual muscle group. Proof of the existence of these spinal circuits in man, and the ability to activate and control these circuits by first mapping the spinal cord is the basis of this proposal.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
11
March
2016
1:00pm
Owen Jones
Law & Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience: Promise, Perils, and New Findings   (more ...)
The MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience: Promise, Perils, and New Findings   (hide ...)

The fields of law and neuroscience may seem unlikely bedfellows. But given that law deals in the complexities of human decision-making and behavior, the intersection of these two fields was (for better or worse) inevitable. This talk provides an overview of the new interdisciplinary field that has emerged at that intersection, with particular emphasis on the formative work of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Law and Neuroscience (www.lawneuro.org). Headquartered at Vanderbilt, the Research Network has partnered legal scholars, judges, and neuroscientists from around the nation in collaborative empirical and conceptual work relevant to the justice system.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
14
March
2016
1:00pm
John Spear
Vanderbilt University
Quantitative Characterization of Biological Tissues by NMR Relaxation in the Rotating Frame
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
Wednesday
16
March
2016
10:00am
David Hormuth II
Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University
Predicting the Spatio-Temporal Evolution of Tumor Growth and Treatment Response in a Murine Model of Glioma
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
Friday
18
March
2016
1:00pm
Aashim Bhatia, M.D., M.S.
CME Accredited Lecture
Department Radiology and Radiological Sciences
Imaging in Pediatric Stroke   (more ...)
Imaging in Pediatric Stroke   (hide ...)

Early diagnosis of stroke in children is critical in limiting morbidity and mortality, with neuroimaging a critical component. Multiple factors contribute to missed or frequently delayed diagnosis of pediatric stroke. Advancements in imaging have allowed for quicker and more accurate diagnosis of pediatric stroke. During this presentation, an overview of the etiology of pediatric stroke as well as discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of various imaging modalities will be reviewed. There will be a discussion of the standard imaging stroke protocol in children and indications for using Gadolinium based contrast agents. We will also focus on advancements in MRI, a particular area of interest of mine, that may allow for quicker acquisition and further understanding of the etiology of pediatric stroke.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Thursday
24
March
2016
12:00pm
Jacob Houghton
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Improving outcomes for pancreatic cancer through precision medicine
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Monday
28
March
2016
1:00pm
Melanie McWade, M.S.
Biomedical Engineering Dissertation Defense
Development of an INtraoperative Tool to Detect Parathyroid Gland Autofluorescence   (more ...)
Development of an INtraoperative Tool to Detect Parathyroid Gland Autofluorescence   (hide ...)

The inability to identify the parathyroid glands is a significant challenge during endocrine surgery. Successful parathyroid and thyroid surgeries require careful resection of diseased tissue and preservation of normal tissues, but this is not always the reality. Inaccurate localization of parathyroid glands during these procedures may permanently prevent patients from achieving normal calcium levels after surgery. Current parathyroid detection methods cannot convey real-time information and are limited to localization of only diseased glands. There is, therefore, a large unmet need in endocrine surgery for a technique to find diseased and normal parathyroid glands during surgery. Previous studies have observed an intrinsic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence signal in the parathyroid gland that is higher than the fluorescence of surrounding neck tissues. The goal of this dissertation is to develop NIR fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging into a reliable, real-time tool for parathyroid detection regardless of disease state. Studies were also performed to understand the biological basis of the NIR autofluorescence signal. This dissertation work is aimed at lowering the barrier for clinical translation of the technology. Widespread adoption of NIR fluorescence detection of the parathyroid glands will greatly improve patient care by reducing harmful surgical complications.
Biophotonics Seminar, Light Hall, Room 202
Friday
01
April
2016
1:00pm
Henry Van Brocklin
University of California, San Francisco
From photons to positrons: Development of Targeted Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Monday
04
April
2016
12:00pm
David Mankoff, MD, PhD
University of Pennsylvania
Molecular Imaging of Breast Cancer: Clinical and Biological Insights
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
08
April
2016
1:00pm
Danny Reich
Chief, Translational Neuroradiology Unit
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
Imaging the Lesion in Multiple Sclerosis   (more ...)
Imaging the Lesion in Multiple Sclerosis   (hide ...)

How, and how well, do acute white matter lesions heal in multiple sclerosis (MS)? Can tissue repair be characterized in vivo? And how might we test emerging treatments to promote such repair in early phase clinical trials? After more than a century of research into the pathology of MS, and 35 years since MRI was first applied in the disease, the answers to these questions still elude us. Emerging data from epidemiological studies seem to confirm our intuition that tissue destruction within lesions may be highly relevant to the long-term accumulation of disability that occurs in progressive MS. At the same time, treatments that are most effective in reducing the chance of new lesion formation can also be dangerously immunosuppressive. Fortunately, there is now convincing experimental evidence that extensive endogenous repair, including remyelination, can occur soon after a lesion first appears, raising the possibility that therapeutic promotion of such repair might have both short-term and long-lasting benefits. In this talk, I will present data from our group's studies in the radiology and pathology of active MS1,2 and primate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis3 that together provide a framework for the spatiotemporal evolution of new white matter lesions. I will discuss how the blood-brain barrier is altered in distinct ways at different stages of lesion formation, and in particular how these alterations are reflected in magnetic susceptibility changes detectable using ultra-high-field (7 tesla) MRI. I will further show how such changes can be used to monitor and predict the extent of lesion repair, even over periods of several months. The ability to image these processes leads naturally to a set of efficient trial designs for short-term, proof-of-concept clinical trials to assess lesion repair, 4 potentially opening the way for the development of add-on agents that may limit the amount of tissue damage that occurs within new white matter lesions.

1. Gaitan MI, Shea CD, Evangelou IE, et al. Evolution of the blood-brain barrier in newly forming multiple sclerosis lesions. Annals of Neurology 2011;70(1):22?29.
2. Absinta M, Sati P, Gaitan MI, et al. Seven-tesla phase imaging of acute multiple sclerosis lesions: a new window into the inflammatory process. Annals of Neurology 2013;74(5):669?678.
3. Maggi P, Macri SMC, Gaitan MI, et al. The formation of inflammatory demyelinated lesions in cerebral white matter. Annals of Neurology 2014;76(4):594?608.
4. Reich DS, White R, Cortese IC, et al. Sample-size calculations for short-term proof-of-concept studies of tissue protection and repair in multiple sclerosis lesions via conventional clinical imaging. Mult Scler 2015;21(13):1693?1704.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
15
April
2016
1:00pm
Yen-Yu Ian Shih
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Up and Down of the fMRI Signals in the Striatum   (more ...)
Up and Down of the fMRI Signals in the Striatum   (hide ...)

The relationship between hemodynamics and neuronal activity may not always be straightforward. Our previous studies showed that negative fMRI responses in the striatum are evoked by peripheral sensory stimulation, which are correlated with increased neuronal activity and dependent upon dopamine D2 receptor signaling. Conversely, a recent optogenetic study from our group has demonstrated selective stimulation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons induces striatal CBV increases, which are blocked by a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist. These collective findings suggest that striatal hemodynamics may present in a dichotomous fashion, with activity between D1 and D2 receptor expressing striatal projection neurons evoking opposing hemodynamic responses (positive and negative responses, respectively). To further shed light on the unique neurovascular coupling in the striatum, we employed an optogenetic fMRI approach to address questions of whether vasodilation occurs in the striatum during selective stimulation of striatal input from the motor cortex, and antidromic stimulation of striatal output. Based on the well-known ?input? theory of fMRI responses and results from our prior work, one might anticipate that both stimulations would induce positive fMRI responses. Surprisingly, that was wrong ? both manipulations reliably evoked negative fMRI responses in the striatum.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
19
April
2016
4:00pm
Mingfeng Bai
University of Pittsburgh
Multilayer Photodynamic Therapy for Highly Effective and Safe Cancer Treatment   (more ...)
Multilayer Photodynamic Therapy for Highly Effective and Safe Cancer Treatment   (hide ...)

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved, minimally invasive, and highly controllable therapeutic procedure, which has gained popularity as an alternative or additional approach to conventional cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and surgery. Because PDT photosensitizers (PSs) only produce phototoxicity in the irradiated area, this approach avoids systemic toxicity. Despite recent efforts to develop tumor-targeted PDT PSs, complete eradication of tumor cells by PDT alone remains challenging due to the limited efficacy. As a way to improve PDT efficacy, we developed a new combinatory PDT therapy approach that specifically targets multilayers of cells. By introducing phototoxicity to distinct cellular layers simultaneously, various cellular pathways were activated, leading to desired synergistic effects. In addition, such a therapy approach offers minimal side effects due to use of localized light irradiation and multiple receptor targeting.
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
22
April
2016
1:00pm
Kate Hartley
CME Accredited Lecture
Vanderbilt University
The Accidental Researcher   (more ...)
The Accidental Researcher   (hide ...)

Academic Medicine offers many paths to clinicians. A career represents a journey, accompanied by others, with pauses, course corrections, and occasional bushwhacking, to a destination not fully known. The lessons and answers are on the path, not at its end. I will share my walk as a junior clinical faculty member, highlighting the expected and unexpected outcomes of several collaborative efforts.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
29
April
2016
1:00pm
Allen Newton
Vanderbilt University
Children are Not Small Adults: Opportunities for Translational Imaging in Children   (more ...)
Children are Not Small Adults: Opportunities for Translational Imaging in Children   (hide ...)

Children are not small adults, but most imaging solutions are developed with adults in mind. Children are unique in that they suffer from diseases not commonly seen in adults, their bodies change form and function in ways that those of adults do not, and they behave in ways that are not common for adults. Together, these differences present a unique challenge when imaging children clinically with MRI. Here, we will discuss our efforts with respect to translational pediatric imaging and functional neuroimaging, with special attention paid to understanding the realities of current clinical MRI programs and opportunities for improving them.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
03
May
2016
4:00pm
Ken Lau
Vanderbilt University, Dept. of Cell and Developmental Biology
Strategies to identify rare cell behaviors in intestinal malignancies   (more ...)
Strategies to identify rare cell behaviors in intestinal malignancies   (hide ...)

Cellular heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for cancer biology. Rare cell populations, such as cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells, can resist therapy and metastasize to other organs. The ability to perturb and track rare cell behaviors present attractive translational strategies, yet, since rare cell behaviors do not reflect bulk population behavior, lysate-mixture-based experimental approaches are inadequate for characterizing rare cells from tissues. Here, I introduce single-cell experimental approaches, DISSECT-CyTOF and MultiOmyx microscopy, that assay signaling from epithelial cells isolated from intestinal tissue. Coupled with a graph-based computational approach we developed, we use multi-parameter analysis to define cell populations by their phenotypic behaviors. We present a case study using these approaches to illustrate the cellular signaling landscape of MSI vs. MSS colorectal cancer retrieved from FFPE tissue blocks.
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
17
May
2016
4:00pm
Michael Nickels
Vanderbilt University
Radiochemistry: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know but Were Too Shy to Ask
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
27
May
2016
1:00pm
Bernd Pichler, PhD
University of Tubingen
PET/MRI: Multiparametric Imaging in Preclinical and Translational Research   (more ...)
PET/MRI: Multiparametric Imaging in Preclinical and Translational Research   (hide ...)

Combined PET/MRI technologies have matured over the last years and have found their places as emerging tools in preclinical and clinical research. Our aim is to exploit the potential of PET/MR in various fields of biomedical research focusing on imaging of immune cell trafficking, cancer research, neurodegeneration and infectious diseases. The wealth of multiparametric morphological, functional and molecular information provided by PET/MR requires advanced methods of image data analysis and data mining. One of our approaches is to combine in vivo imaging data with omics information which links imaging science and the powerful disciplines of omics and bioinformatics.
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
07
June
2016
4:00pm
David Zald
Vanderbilt University, Dept. of Psychology
Advancing PET Imaging of Dopamine
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
21
June
2016
4:00pm
Michael Schulte
Vanderbilt University
Glutaminolysis as a Target for Precision Cancer Medicine and Companion Molecular Imaging Diagnostics
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
19
July
2016
4:00pm
Michael Evans
University of California San Francisco
Measuring oncogene signaling in cancer with PET   (more ...)
Measuring oncogene signaling in cancer with PET   (hide ...)

Over the past two decades, molecular imaging tools have been aggressively developed and applied in cancer models and patients to study tumor biology while improving cancer detection and management. Despite many advances, one of the major challenges has been developing translational imaging tools that selectively measure the activity of important signaling pathways and/or drug targets within the cancer cell. To address this challenge, we have pioneered a workflow in which we apply ?omics? technologies to interrogate the biology downstream of an oncogene of interest to identify cell surface antigens that are compatible with PET imaging, and selectively regulated by the oncogene. Using this new approach, we have developed the first translational imaging tools to measure the activity of oncogenes like the androgen receptor, MYC, mTORC1, and RAS with PET, and we have begun to validate these imaging biomarkers in man at UCSF. Moving forward, we anticipate these radiotracers will significantly improve our understanding of human tumor biology, as well as empower more systematic decision making in the clinic.
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
02
August
2016
4:00pm
Kiel Neumann, PhD
Postdoctoral Scholar
University of California San Francisco
"Dynamic" Molecular Imaging: A Tale of Two Stories   (more ...)
"Dynamic" Molecular Imaging: A Tale of Two Stories   (hide ...)

CounterACTing Chemical Warfare with PET
The use of organophosphorus compounds (OP), such as sarin gas, as chemical weapons continues to be a significant threat to both military personnel and citizens. The lethality of these ?weapons of mass destruction? arises from OP potent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which, if not treated immediately (seconds to minutes), leads to paralysis and ultimately, death. To date, a single class of oxime compounds, such as 2PAM, is the only clinically approved treatment for OP toxicity and at physiological pH, the charged nature of these oximes renders them ineffective CNS penetrants. The main bottleneck for advancing countermeasures for the OP toxidrome is a lack of mechanism-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses that cannot efficiently quantitate and verify relative amounts of OP, OP-AChE adduct, and/or oxime antidote in peripheral circulation and the CNS. We have developed four positron-labeled OP nerve agents and a positron-labeled analogue of 2PAM and have used the agents to understand the OP toxidrome in vivo through dynamic PET imaging with concomitant arterial sampling. Moving forward, we aim to expand this methodology to allow external investigators to discern critical in vivo PK distribution, PD attributes and localization of the AChE target in appropriate animal models and ultimately, strengthen and/or develop new antidotes for OP toxicity.

GKX: A sugar substitute for cancer?
Lung cancer is responsible for the most cancer-related mortalities worldwide. Of the nearly 225,000 new cases of lung cancer in 2016, 85% will be classified as nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy remains a major treatment modality and the only adjuvant therapy proven to prolong patient survival after surgical resection. Major advances in early-stage diagnostics have been made within the last 10 years, along with discoveries of novel biomarkers, which have formed the basis for targeted therapies based on oncogene/tumor suppressor status. However, to date, the 5-year survival rate for NSCLC remains marginal at 19%. The high mortality rate is due, in part, to the high molecular heterogeneity observed in NSCLC, which obfuscates correlating targetable driver mutations with chemotherapy response, leaving systemic chemotherapy as the frontline adjuvant therapy option. The lung cancer field would gain significantly by the availability of a non-invasive tool that could stratify early-stage NSCLC patients who are most likely to relapse after surgical resection; furthermore, guide the clinician on whether a systemic chemotherapy drug, such as cisplatin, will provide any relevant change in the patient?s 5-year survival rate and overall survival compared to a more targeted molecular therapy.
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
23
August
2016
4:00pm
Lisa Kachnic, MD, FASTRO
Professor and Chair, Dept of Radiation Oncology
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
The Role of Imaging Science in Radiation Therapy Research: Clinical and Translational Collaborative Research Opportunities   (more ...)
The Role of Imaging Science in Radiation Therapy Research: Clinical and Translational Collaborative Research Opportunities   (hide ...)

Objectives:
1) Understand the infrastructure and unique talent in the radiation department that may be leveraged for collaborative research
2) Review existing collaborations
3) Discuss key research questions in radiation oncology that require imaging endpoints

There will be a "Reception and Brainstorming Session" immediately following the seminar.
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
02
September
2016
10:00am
Alex Smith
Graduate Student
Investigating the Quantitative Nature of Magnetization Transfer in vivo at 3 Tesla
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
Friday
09
September
2016
1:00pm
Manus, Donahue, PhD
CME Accredited Lecture
Integration of Imaging Biomarkers into Routine Radiological Practice   (more ...)
Integration of Imaging Biomarkers into Routine Radiological Practice   (hide ...)

Our work focuses on applying imaging methodologies to identify quantitative biomarkers of disease progression that manifest prior to irreversible tissue damage, and as such can be used to titrate prophylactic therapies in subclinical disease stages. I will discuss how these methods are being applied in different disorders of the circulation (blood and lymphatic flow) (i) in basic investigations of human physiology, (ii) as endpoints in clinical trials at Vanderbilt, and (iii) finally how the clinical imaging infrastructure at Vanderbilt has been expanded to incorporate a subgroup of these methods.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
16
September
2016
1:00pm
Sanjay Jain, MD
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
In vivo Imaging of Bacterial Infections
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
23
September
2016
1:00pm
Bruce Berkowitz, PhD
Professor and Director of Small Animal MRI Facility
Wayne State University School of Medicine
Co-sponsored by the Vanderbilt Eye Institute and Vision Research Center
CANCELLED
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
04
October
2016
4:00pm
Eduard Chekmenev, PhD
Associate Professor, Dept of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering
Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science
Molecular Imaging Using Hyperpolarized MRI
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
07
October
2016
12:00am
Adam Anderson, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Why the sky is blue and 7T MRI is hard
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
12
October
2016
1:00pm
Chris Lankford
Multiple Echo, Caesar Cipher Acquisition and Model-Based Reconstruction (ME-CAMBREC): a Novel Accelerated T2 Mapping Method
Dissertation Defense, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
14
October
2016
1:00pm
Danila Barskiy, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Quantum mechanical tricks for magnetic resonance: hyperpolarization and long-lived nuclear spin states
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
21
October
2016
1:00pm
Sandeep Arora, MBBS
CME Accredited Lecture
Abdominal Imaging and Intervention research - Advanced MRI techniques, Iron nanoparticles and Therapeutic Ultrasound
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
01
November
2016
4:00pm
Xin Zhang, BS
Graduate Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering
[18F] fluoride-radiolabeled molecular concentration using microfluidics   (more ...)
[18F] fluoride-radiolabeled molecular concentration using microfluidics   (hide ...)

[18F] fluoride, a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical widely used in medical imaging modality positron emission tomography(PET) due to its longer half-time of 110 minutes, is concentrated with a miniaturized anion exchange column located on PDMS microchip. Microfluidics has been applied to perform fluoride enrichment in small dimension and simultaneously obtains faster diffusion and reactive kinetics. This manuscript reported a simple and easy-controlling method for rapidly and efficiently radioactive isotope, here specifically [18F] fluoride, capture. Instead of relying on complicated flow control elements (e.g. valves), pillars, interval less than average diameter of anion exchange beads, are set inside microchannel for beads-trapping. In our own work, flow containing diluted [18F] fluoride was driven by syringe pump in proper loading rate through anion exchange column. The high flow resistance assisted elimination of air bubble inside channel, making simple control handling dependable. This device is further amended to trap exact amount of anion exchange beads, satisfying several human doses. We demonstrated the device by trapping [18F] fluoride rapidly and efficiently. Our device is composed of a main chamber (2.9 L) with microchannel (9mm long each) connecting to inlet and outlet. Direct laser writer was applied to create patterns on silicon wafer for simplifying fabrication procedures. Certain amount of anion exchange beads was trapped by double-row square pillars near the outlet of chamber, then following immediate beads activation. Diluted [18F] fluoride was concentrated by flowing through microchamber. The enriched product was then eluted to achieve fully released for further solvent exchange. Successful fluoride trapping was confirmed by actuating diluted radioactive solution (100 mCi/mL) through microchannel. We observed almost fully capture of radioactivity on our chips with fleeting time period (less than 10 minutes). Moreover elution with small volume(less than 200 L) of Kryptofix (K222) released nearly all fluoride. Thus, this device is capable of simply and efficiently trapping [18F] fluoride and being eluted to obtain high concentration product within small volume.
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
04
November
2016
1:00pm
Victoria Morgan, PhD
CME Accredited Lecture
Beyond the focus. Why imaging networks is important in temporal lobe epilepsy.   (more ...)
Beyond the focus. Why imaging networks is important in temporal lobe epilepsy.   (hide ...)

Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is one of the most common forms of focal epilepsy with seizures generated from a single brain region. However, the term ?focal? epilepsy is misleading in that there is evidence that TLE seizures propagate along widespread networks originating from the focus in the hippocampus and affecting lateral temporal lobe, subcortical, frontal and parietal regions. We hypothesize that understanding how these widespread brain networks change in epilepsy can provide insight into the characteristics of seizures and their associated neurocognitive impairments. In addition, network based biomarkers may be useful in predicting treatment response or developing more effective treatments for the individual patient. Over several years, our group has developed MRI functional and structural connectivity methods targeted towards these clinical applications. In this talk, some recent examples of our work in these areas will be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
11
November
2016
1:00pm
Jim Pekar, PhD
Johns Hopkins Medicine
Spontaneous Fluctuations Reveal Connectivity Between Intrinsic Brain Networks: From Spinal Cord Injury to Developmental Disorders   (more ...)
Spontaneous Fluctuations Reveal Connectivity Between Intrinsic Brain Networks: From Spinal Cord Injury to Developmental Disorders   (hide ...)

Magnetic resonance imaging sensitized to neuronal hemodynamics reveals spontaneous fluctuations that can be decomposed into synchrony within, and synchrony between, intrinsic brain networks. This resting-state synchrony is a useful measure of brain functional connectivity. We show that connectivity between visual & motor networks is: increased in persons with chronic spinal cord injury; decreased in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder; associated with symptom severity in both populations. This approach promises to yield noninvasive imaging-based biomarkers that are needed in order to reveal disease mechanisms, improve diagnosis and prognosis, and assess therapeutic interventions.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
15
November
2016
4:00pm
Justin Balko, PharmD, PhD
Assistant Professor, Dept of Medicine and Cancer Biology
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Predicting and evaluating immunotherapy responses in cancer with immunoPET: strategies for translation
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Thursday
17
November
2016
12:00am
Matthew Cronin, PhD
University of California, Berkeley
Investigating the effects of microstructure and magnetic susceptibility in MRI
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
02
December
2016
1:00pm
Jon Kaas
TBA
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
06
December
2016
4:00pm
Eliot McKinley, PhD
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Dept of Cell and Developmental Biology
Multiplexed immunofluorescence for the characterization of rare cell types
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
09
December
2016
1:00pm
Francesca Bagnato
CME Accredited Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
January
2017
1:00pm
John Gore, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Current and Future Trends in Biomedical Imaging Science
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
January
2017
1:00pm
Tamara Branca, PhD
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Combined Hyperpolarized xenon MRI and xenon enhanced CT for morphological and functional assessment of brown adipose tissue   (more ...)
Combined Hyperpolarized xenon MRI and xenon enhanced CT for morphological and functional assessment of brown adipose tissue   (hide ...)

Our inability to accurately measure brown adipose tissue (BAT) volume and thermogenic activity remains one of the major roadblocks to our understanding of the physiology and function of this tissue in humans. While we currently use both 18F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI to assess BAT tissue function and mass, partial volume effects and lack of specificity have prevented accurate quantification of tissue mass and function. As a result, it is still not clear how much brown fat adult humans really have and whether obese subject are obese because they lack BAT function or because they lack BAT altogether.
Here we show that magnetic resonance with Hyperpolarized 129Xe gas (HP129XeMR) and xenon enhanced CT can provide a complete picture of BAT, both from a functional and morphological standpoint. We show that HP129XeMR, typically used to assess lung ventilation function, can also be used for MR thermometry of fatty tissues. When temperature measurements are performed during stimulation of thermogenic activity, HP129XeMR can then provide a direct measurement of the thermogenic capacity of this tissue, revealing profound differences between lean and obese phenotypes. At the same time, xenon enhanced CT, typically considered as an alternative to HP129XeMR, provides complementary information on tissue volume, revealing extensive hypertrophy of this tissue in the obese phenotype in which this tissue is largely 'invisible'. Validation in rodents and preliminary results in humans will be presented.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
January
2017
1:00pm
Stephan Heckers, MD, MSc
Vanderbilt University
CME Accredited Seminar
What is wrong with the hippocampus in schizophrenia?
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
February
2017
1:00pm
Brian Welch, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Non-Cartesian MRI Demystified   (more ...)
Non-Cartesian MRI Demystified   (hide ...)

Despite being the first approach for acquiring MR images, non-Cartesian sampling trajectories remain underutilized compared to ubiquitous rectilinear Cartesian methods. Compared to Cartesian sampling, non-Cartesian methods such as radial, spiral and PROPE
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
10
February
2017
1:00pm
David Vago
Vanderbilt University
Mapping the Meditative Mind ? Neural substrates for Modalities of Awareness   (more ...)
Mapping the Meditative Mind ? Neural substrates for Modalities of Awareness   (hide ...)

This seminar will examine in detail the underlying neurobiological substrates that support peak states of phenomenal clarity during mindful awareness in a cross-section of meditators with variable expertise. Differences in visual, auditory, and somatic modalities of awareness in the context of meditation will also be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
17
February
2017
1:00pm
Erik Mittra, MD
Stanford University
Glutamate PET imaging for cancer   (more ...)
Glutamate PET imaging for cancer   (hide ...)

Improved methods to non-invasively diagnose and evaluate patients with cancer are critical for diagnosis, prognosis, and response assessment. (4S)-4-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-L-glutamate (18F-FSPG) is a novel 18F-labeled L-glutamate derivative for PET imaging. Inside the cell, L-glutamate is known to play important roles for glutaminolysis, for glutathione biosynthesis, and as exchange substrate for system xC-. The glutaminolytic pathway is receiving more and more attention as an alternate energy source, beyond glycolysis, for cancer cells. And, as part of the cellular detoxification system, system xC- (stabilized by the cell-surface glycoprotein CD44) and glutathione play an important role for protection against reactive oxygen species and tumor survival during therapy. There has also recently been the development of several chemotherapy compounds that inhibit the glutaminolytic pathway. A new, first-in-class, glutaminase inhibitor (CB-839, Calithera Biosciences) has been developed to target the glutaminase pathway by blocking the conversion of glutamine to glutamate. A major barrier to developing this and other such therapeutics is the requirement for better biomarkers to accelerate clinical development and assist in determining optimal dose associated with pharmacodynamic effect in vivo, proper patient selection and response assessment. With this background, and in the context of the over-riding goal in cancer research to have clinically applicable, non-invasive methods to image specific receptors and pathways for targeted therapy (i.e. imaging biomarkers to enable precision medicine), the 18F-FPSG molecule is perfectly suited for further research as a human PET imaging agent. Considerable preclinical evaluation of this 18F-FSPG shows rapid blood clearance and low background activity providing high contrast for tumor imaging. Preliminary studies in human patients with many different types of cancer confirm these findings, showing particularly good results in a subset of patients.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
21
February
2017
4:00pm
Kimryn Rathmell, MD, PhD
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Imaging Metabolism in Kidney Cancer
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
24
February
2017
1:00pm
Scott Swanson, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Magnetization transfer MRI: principles, practice, and new potential   (more ...)
Magnetization transfer MRI: principles, practice, and new potential   (hide ...)

Magnetization transfer (MT) MRI indirectly images the semisolid components of tissues (large proteins, polysaccharides, and phospholipids) by means of the easily detected water signal. Recent work has identified that a variant of MT, termed inhomogeneous MT (ihMT), creates MR images that are highly specific to the lipids in myelin. This talk will outline the biophysical foundations of MT and ihMT, present methods to measure lipid fluidity and lipid order in model myelin membranes, and discuss future applications to white matter diseases such as multiple sclerosis.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
March
2017
1:00pm
Kim Sandler
CME Accredited Seminar
Vanderbilt Lung Screening: Past, Present and Future   (more ...)
Vanderbilt Lung Screening: Past, Present and Future   (hide ...)

Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer among men and women in the United States. Although smoking has long been known to be the most predictive risk factor for the development of lung cancer, official guidelines for lung cancer screening in high-risk populations were developed only recently. This has led to a traditionally late-stage diagnosis of lung cancer with limited treatment options and high mortality rates. In 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force released guidelines for annual lung cancer screening for those who qualify, based on results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Vanderbilt participated as one of 33 academic medical centers in the NLST, which demonstrated a 20% reduction in overall mortality from lung cancer with annual screening. However, the adoption of these screening guidelines has been slow in many practices. As the Vanderbilt Lung Screening Program continues to grow, we are continuing to develop new outreach initiatives to improve enrollment, including a recently conceptualized randomized control trial to evaluate outreach strategies. This lecture will provide a brief history of lung screening, both nationally and at VUMC, demographics and summary of screening results in our patient population, and future directions for the program.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
10
March
2017
1:00pm
Kevin Harkins, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
How to Jump Start Your Career with Bad Data
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
17
March
2017
1:00pm
Francesca Bagnato, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
How Magnetic Resonance Imaging has Revolutionized the Care of Multiple Sclerosis   (more ...)
How Magnetic Resonance Imaging has Revolutionized the Care of Multiple Sclerosis   (hide ...)

Ever since its advent in the 1980s, MRI has become fundamental for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with multiple sclerosis. MRI has also revolutionized multiple sclerosis care. The present seminar will offer an opportunity to: (1) understand the role of MRI in clinical and research setting, (2) describe the pathological correlates of MRI findings in multiple sclerosis patients, (3) discuss the unmet imaging needs in the multiple sclerosis field. 
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
March
2017
1:00pm
Limin Chen, PhD
Vanderbilt University
Neuroimaging beyond the brain: multiparametric MRI of spinal cord plasticity after injury in monkeys   (more ...)
Neuroimaging beyond the brain: multiparametric MRI of spinal cord plasticity after injury in monkeys   (hide ...)

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating medical condition that disrupts neural pathways, can lead to severe sensory impairment and motor deficits, and severely worsens the quality of life of SCI patients. Over time, however some aspects of impaired function can recover. There has long existed a need for objective, noninvasive metrics of the nature of temporal changes and recovery of injured spinal cord tissue from structural, functional, and molecular perspectives. Non-invasive quantitative MRI and fMRI are well suited for these purposes. These methods have been technically challenging, mainly due to the small size of the spinal cord, MRI field inhomogeneity, and motion artifacts caused by cerebral spinal fluid pulsation associated with cardiac and respiratory cycles. I will report our new developments of multi-parametric CEST, qMT, DTI, and fMRI for longitudinal quantification of the spontaneous recovery of injured spinal cord tissue and function. I will show data illustrating the power of such an approach for monitoring changes of molecular composition (with CEST), white matter microstructure and number of traceable white matter bundles (with DTI), myelination state (with qMT), and status of functional connectivity of grey matter horns (with resting state fMRI) in a well-controlled primate SCI model. Correlation analysis of the MRI/fMRI metrics and the indices of the behavioral impairment supports the clinical relevance of these non-invasive measures. These metrics have the potential to become sensitive and objective imaging biomarkers for evaluating SCI injury severity, clinical prognosis, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
31
March
2017
1:00pm
Gianmarco Pinton, PhD
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill &
North Carolina State University
Ultrasound and nonlinear wave propagation in the human body   (more ...)
Ultrasound and nonlinear wave propagation in the human body   (hide ...)

The soft tissue of the human body supports both fast acoustic waves (1540 m/s) and slow shear waves (2 m/s). At large amplitudes these waves exhibit nonlinear behavior, such as harmonic development and shock formation. We have developed models and simulation tools that describe the physics of nonlinear acoustic propagation, attenuation, and scattering in highly realistic representations of the human body. We have used these models to develop new ultrasound imaging methods and to noninvasively treat brain tumors. We have also developed a new imaging high frame-rate (10,000 images/second) imaging technique that can directly and accurately image brain motion down to the micron level during traumatic brain injury. This study shows that shear shock waves are generated and propagate in the brain.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
07
April
2017
1:00pm
Bruce Berkowitz, PhD
CANCELLED!
Wayne State University School of Medicine
co-sponsored: Vanderbilt Eye Institute and Vision Research Center
Oxidative Stress and its Functional Consequences Measured In Vivo by MRI   (more ...)
Oxidative Stress and its Functional Consequences Measured In Vivo by MRI   (hide ...)

In 1992, it was not obvious that MRI, a relatively insensitive and still developing imaging method, would be useful for examining the retina, one of the thinnest organs in the body. Since then, Dr. Berkowitz has established a body of work that highlights MRI as a surprisingly useful discovery tool in vision research. These methods have been successful transitioned into cancer and brain research areas, and are used by drug companies and other investigators world-wide. Improvements in resolution and methodology have even allowed us to measure the physiology of sub-compartments within rod cells in vivo. These data are spatially grounded based on optical coherence tomography images and compared to visual performance using optokinetic tracking. His current pioneering efforts uses MRI to measure neuronal oxidative stress without a contrast agent in untreatable neurodegenerative disease to optimize antioxidant treatment in vivo.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
14
April
2017
1:00pm
Joseph Ackerman, PhD
William Greenleaf Eliot Professor
Professor, Dept. of Chemisty
Washington University in St. Louis
Probing Living Systems with Magnetic Resonance: Four Vignettes in Neurobiology and an Un-Murder Mystery   (more ...)
Probing Living Systems with Magnetic Resonance: Four Vignettes in Neurobiology and an Un-Murder Mystery   (hide ...)

· A mouse model of single-hemispheric delayed/late time-to-onset radiation necrosis (RN), which recapitulates the entire gestalt of clinical signatures, has been developed employing the Leksell GammaÒ Knife PerfexionTM (192 60Co radiation sources: 0.5 mm targeting accuracy). MRI detection of the onset and quantification of the extent of RN in this mouse model has been validated by correlative histology. · This preclinical model provides a powerful platform to evaluate therapies (drugs) that hold promise to protect and/or mitigate against RN. Additionally, implanting tumor cells in the irradiated tissue bed provides a model of recurrent cancer post-irradiation, an important clinical challenge in the post-treatment (resection®chemotherapy®radiation) management of patients with brain tumors. · Tissue pO2 (dissolved O2 content) is a critical determinant of cellular function and its direct quantification by MRI would be a major advance. O2 is weakly paramagnetic and, thus, affects tissue water 1H MR relaxation. Therefore, in principle, it should be possible to convert a map of 1H MR longitudinal (spin lattice) relaxation times directly to a map of tissue pO2. In practice, competing relaxation effects require mitigation · MRI signal models are often based on multi-compartment tissue models that postulate compartment specific biophysical and/or MR properties for water in the intracellular vs. extracellular spaces. Such descriptions generally assume that water exchange between compartments is slow relative to the MR experimental time scale. The average residence times (preexchange lifetimes) for intracellular water in neurons and glia cells have been determined from water 1H MR longitudinal relaxation experiments with a perfused ?Brains-on-Beads? model system. · Finally, if time allows, 31P NMR in vivo will be used to resolve a mystery in which the crime was a murder that did not happen, an un-murder mystery!
Founder Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
02
May
2017
4:00pm
Evan Brittain, MD, MSc
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
PET Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Metabolism in Pulmonary Hypertension
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Wednesday
26
July
2017
9:00am
Jennifer Morgan Watchmaker
Intracranial Hemodynamic Compensation Mechanisms in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
Thursday
27
July
2017
10:00am
Samantha By
Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Spinal Cord In Vivo: Feasibility and Application of Advanced Diffusion Models
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
Tuesday
15
August
2017
4:00pm
Mingfeng Bai, PhD
Assistant Professor, VUIIS
Development and in vivo evaluation of targeted photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Tuesday
05
September
2017
4:00pm
Jun Li, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow, VUIIS
A Novel Molecular Imaging Probe for Optical Surgical Navigation of Pancreatic Cancer
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
08
September
2017
1:00pm
Thomas Theis
Assistant Research Professor of Chemistry, Duke University
Hyperpolarization Chemistry for Affordable Biomolecular MRI    (more ...)
Hyperpolarization Chemistry for Affordable Biomolecular MRI    (hide ...)

Virtually all clinical MR images are of water, and virtually all of these images are acquired with expensive superconducting high-field magnets. High fields are needed to maximize polarization and sensitivity. Yet even with the strongest magnets, it is extremely challenging to detect biomolecules at low concentrations directly reporting on biological function deep inside human organs. The presented research focuses on low-cost hyperpolarization and low-cost, low-field MRI to deliver ultrasensitive and affordable biomolecular MRI. We develop and characterize parahydrogen based polarization transfer catalysis (SABRE-SHEATH), which we use to hyperpolarize metabolites, drugs and other small molecules directly in room temperature solutions (organic and aqueous).(1-4) The resulting hyperpolarization boost NMR and MRI signal by up to ten million fold (depending on exact hyperpolarization level and the field at which we acquire the signals). A challenge, however, is the fast decay of hyperpolarized signals. Therefore, we design the hyperpolarized substrates with heteronuclear (15N and 13C) spin labeling schemes for long-term retention of hyperpolarization. We achieve decay time constants of above 20 minutes enabling hour-long molecular tracking.(2) We observe particularly long lifetimes at low magnetic fields of 1 T and below.(3) Therefore, low magnetic fields become attractive, not only because of their affordability and ease of use, but because they enable metabolic tracking on biological timescales. We discuss sensitivity scaling as a function of magnetic field, and present first principle insights as well as experimental demonstrations showing significant gains for longer waiting times as we move to lower fields.(3, 5) Figure 1 illustrates our nascent technology and its potential for hyperpolarized low-field molecular MRI.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Wednesday
13
September
2017
4:10pm
Gustavo Rohde, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
A Signal Transformation Approach for Transport-Based Pattern Theory   (more ...)
A Signal Transformation Approach for Transport-Based Pattern Theory   (hide ...)

We describe a new class of signal processing & data analysis techniques based on the mathematics of optimal mass transport. These techniques can be interpreted as nonlinear transforms with well defined-forward (analysis) and inverse (synthesis) operations with demonstrable advantages over standard linear transforms (Fourier, Wavelet, Radon, Ridgelet, etc.). In particular, they are able to provide parsimonious signal and image representation models which can be shown theoretically and experimentally to enhance linear separability of signal classes. We demonstrate these techniques on applications related to inverse problems and biomedical image analysis.
Seminar of Interest, Stevenson 1432
Friday
15
September
2017
1:00pm
Yong Wang, PhD
Washington University of Medicine in St. Louis
From Electrocardiographic Imaging to Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Beyond   (more ...)
From Electrocardiographic Imaging to Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Beyond   (hide ...)

Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) is a powerful, noninvasive cardiac imaging technique that has overcome limitations of traditional ECG, such as poor diagnosis specificity, lacking of spatial information and so on. Through solving an ill-posed inverse problem, ECGI resolves and transforms the multi-channel mixed ECG signals measured on the chest noninvasively onto heart surface with significant improvement of specificity. ECGI has been successfully used to guide radiofrequency ablations to treat cardiac arrhythmia in human. The success and experience in developing ECGI directly inspired and impacted the invention and development of a new diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) called diffusion basis spectrum imaging (DBSI). ECGI and DBSI are twins growing up in two completely different families/fields, with the same technology genes (ill-posed inverse problem) but different application bodies (Cardiology and Radiology). In this seminar, I will first introduce ECGI technology, then discuss how DBSI is invented/developed with clinical applications. I will also talk about the new development of DBSI in cancer imaging. I will conclude by discussing other applications that can potentially benefit from the same technique underlying ECGI and DBSI.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
22
September
2017
1:00pm
Robert Gould, PhD
Vanderbilt University
How multimodal neuroimaging technologies can provide innovative approaches for the treatment of Substance Use Disorders    (more ...)
How multimodal neuroimaging technologies can provide innovative approaches for the treatment of Substance Use Disorders    (hide ...)

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) remains a large public health problem worldwide that contributes to negative consequences at individual, familial, local community and global levels. Neuroimaging studies have been crucial in establishing that drug addiction is a disorder of the brain and is reflected by the recent change in nomenclature from ?drug abuse or addiction? to ?Substance Use Disorder? in the DSM-V. A brief overview of groundbreaking human and animal studies will be presented demonstrating that habitual and repeated drug use, despite negative consequences is, in fact a brain disorder. Although understanding the pathophysiological effects of chronic drug use is informative, drug treatments for SUD?s are relatively ineffective (for opioid, alcohol and nicotine use) and there remains no FDA-approved treatments for cocaine use disorder. Developing treatments for SUDs requires an understanding of 1) the underlying neurobiological changes caused by repeated drug use; 2) alterations that occur during abstinence following chronic drug use; and, 3) how putative pharmacological or psychosocial treatments affect underlying pathophysiology and future behavior. Ongoing animal studies will be described that focus on developing new treatments for multiple aspects of cocaine use disorder by examining novel pharmacological agents in classic animal models of drug addiction paired with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake animals.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
29
September
2017
1:00pm
Wellington Pham, PhD
Associate Professor, VUIIS
Medicinal Chemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine   (more ...)
Medicinal Chemistry in the Era of Precision Medicine   (hide ...)

This talk will describe a multidisciplinary approach integrating medicinal chemistry with nanotechnology and drug delivery for targeted theranostic applications. Particularly, the sensitivity and specificity enhancements available with multimodal characteristics of nanotechnology combined with high resolution molecular imaging, provide a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers. During this presentation, I will discuss the development of probes, methods of surface fabrication, quantification and the translation of these probes for cancer imaging and vaccine delivery in preclinical animal models and clinical work. Further, innovative assays to diversify the chemical genetics of Abeta-binding analogs will also be discussed.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
06
October
2017
1:00pm
Nellie Byun, PhD
Research Instructor, VUIIS
Pharmacological MRI Approaches for Pharmacology and Neuroscience   (more ...)
Pharmacological MRI Approaches for Pharmacology and Neuroscience   (hide ...)

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with drug stimuli, or pharmacological MRI (phMRI), is a technique used to study the in vivo actions of drugs in the brain. PhMRI also provides a unique approach for studying questions in neuroscience, including brain function, organization, and plasticity. The main goals of phMRI in drug development are two-fold: determining regional brain engagement by the drug of interest that informs on the relationship between dose and therapeutic (and adverse) effects and, second, to objectively quantify brain responses in specific regions instead of relying solely on subjective methods (e.g., self-reports) in humans or animal behavior. For neuroscience research, phMRI is particularly suitable for the study of neurotransmitter modulation and brain circuitry in vivo. First, I will discuss the stages of preclinical drug development of brain disorders, focusing on our phMRI work in a multidisciplinary setting. Next, I will focus on my main area of research, determining how monoaminergic output, particularly dopamine, alters brain activity, and how dopamine signaling can be manipulated by the metabotropic glutamate and muscarinic achetylcholine systems. A third, future, application of phMRI is in personalized medicine to determine an individual?s ?neurotransmitter receptor and transporter phenotype? that informs on potential responses to drugs, including susceptibility to addiction, and behavioral traits
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
13
October
2017
1:00pm
Jim Delikatny, Ph.D.
Perelman School of Medicine University of Pennsylvania
Probing Cancer Metabolism with Molecular Imaging
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
20
October
2017
1:00pm
Bruce Damon, PhD
Associate Professor, VUIIS
Rigor and Reproducibility: What?s All the Fuss?
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
27
October
2017
1:00pm
Catie Chang, PhD
Advanced MRI, NIH
Vigilance fluctuations and fMRI signal dynamics   (more ...)
Vigilance fluctuations and fMRI signal dynamics   (hide ...)

Changes in vigilance (brain arousal) are associated with prominent changes in neuronal activity, behavior, and physiology. However, these state changes are not typically monitored during fMRI, and their impact on fMRI measures of brain activity and network connectivity is not fully understood. Here, we integrate multi-modal neuroimaging and pattern analysis to develop an approach for tracking vigilance levels from fMRI data alone. In addition, we investigate the contribution of physiological processes (indexed by respiration and cardiac activity) to fMRI signals during changes in vigilance. Finally, we combine whole-brain fMRI with transient pharmacological inactivation in the macaque to examine how cortical fMRI signals linked with vigilance are shaped by specific nuclei in the basal forebrain. These findings suggest that characterizing fMRI dynamics linked with internal state changes can improve the sensitivity and extraction of biomarkers from fMRI
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
03
November
2017
1:00pm
Shane Hutson, PhD
Professor of Physics and of Biological Sciences
Chair, Dept of Physics & Astronomy
Vanderbilt University
Visualizing Fast Ca2+ Dynamics around Microsurgical Wounds   (more ...)
Visualizing Fast Ca2+ Dynamics around Microsurgical Wounds   (hide ...)

For epithelial cells to heal a wound, those cells must first become aware of the presence, location, and size of the wound. This knowledge must be shared by cells in direct contact with the wound and those much further away, the latter of which must be recruited by some sort of mechanical or biochemical signal. We have investigated these signaling mechanisms using the exquisite spatial and temporal control afforded by laser-induced microsurgical wounds. One of the first signals observed after wounding epithelial tissues is a cytoplasmic influx of Ca2+ ions. This signal begins within milliseconds of wounding, expands outwards in multiple stages over the course of seconds to minutes, and finally devolves into localized signal flares that continue for hours as the wound closes. We will delineate what we have learned from visualizing, quantifying and modeling these signal dynamics and the physical and molecular mechanisms that drive them.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
07
November
2017
4:00pm
Steve Townsend, PhD
Assistant Professor, Dept of Chemistry
Vanderbilt University
Human milk oligosaccharides as a defense against infectious diseases
Center for Molecular Probes Seminar Series, VUIIS Classroom (Room AA1119)
Friday
10
November
2017
1:00pm
Zhaohua Ding, PhD
Associate Professor, VUIIS
Exploring Dark Matter in the Human Brain: Functional Tensor Imaging and Beyond   (more ...)
Exploring Dark Matter in the Human Brain: Functional Tensor Imaging and Beyond   (hide ...)

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex. Due to much less vasculature in white matter, it typically appears to be dark in BOLD images. In this talk, a new approach for assessing the functional architecture of brain white matter by fMRI will be introduced. It is shown that newly-discovered anisotropic temporal correlations of fMRI signals between voxels in white matter in a resting state may be used to detect and visualize synchronized functional activity along white matter tracts. This provides an entirely new insight into the relationship between white matter structure and function and suggests new ways to detect activity over extended white matter tracts.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
17
November
2017
1:00pm
Eric Skaar, PhD, MPH
Ernest W. Goodpasture Professor of Pathology, VU
Imaging the battle for metal between host and pathogen   (more ...)
Imaging the battle for metal between host and pathogen   (hide ...)

Hospital and community-acquired infections caused by bacterial pathogens represent an increasing threat to global public health. This threat is compounded by the fact that bacterial pathogens are rapidly becoming resistant to all existing antimicrobial. Research in my laboratory is focused on identifying novel targets for therapeutic intervention against bacterial pathogens with a particular emphasis on systems involved in metal trafficking and metabolism. Metals are essential for all life because approximately 40% of all proteins in nature require metals to carry out their biological function. Bacterial pathogens must acquire metals inside their hosts in order to successfully mediate infection. However, vertebrates have evolved strategies to sequester nutrient metal from invading bacteria in a process known as "nutritional immunity". Based on the strict requirement of bacteria for metal, and the fact that the bacterial and eukaryotic machinery involved in metal acquisition and homeostasis are remarkably different, targeting bacterial machinery involved in metal metabolism has excellent therapeutic potential. This presentation will describe research in my laboratory that is focused on identifying factors and processes involved in the battle for metal between bacterial pathogens and their hosts.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
24
November
2017
1:00pm
Happy Thanksgiving! No Seminar
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
01
December
2017
1:00pm
Richard Dortch, PhD
Research Assistant Professor, VUIIS
Quantitative Neuroimaging of the Peripheral Nervous System
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Friday
08
December
2017
10:00am
Kurt Schilling
Graduate Student
Histological Validation of Diffusion MRI   (more ...)
Histological Validation of Diffusion MRI   (hide ...)

The ability of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) fiber tractography to non-invasively map the three-dimensional (3D) network of the human brain has proven to be a valuable neuroimaging tool, improving our understanding of both normal development and complex brain disorders. However, the process from data acquisition to generation of a 3D map of reconstructed fibers is a multi-step procedure with numerous assumptions and uncertainties that can ultimately affect the ability of this technique to faithfully represent the true axonal connections of the brain. Because of this, validating dMRI tractography is required on many levels. It is necessary not only to measure the ability of these techniques to track white matter fibers from voxel to voxel, but also to quantify the ability of dMRI to assess the underlying fiber orientation distribution (FOD) within each voxel. To do this, we propose to compare diffusion data directly to histology data on both the microstructural scale of tissues and the macrostructural scale of brain connectivity. These experiments will lead to a better understanding of the limitations and pitfalls of dMRI experiments, and provide a quantitative assessment of the reliability of these techniques.
Dissertation Defense, VUIIS Classroom, AA-1119
1:00pm
Daniel Topgaard, Ph.D.
Professor, Lund University
Multidimensional diffusion MRI   (more ...)
Multidimensional diffusion MRI   (hide ...)

Diffusion MRI is an excellent method for detecting subtle microscopic changes of the living human brain, but often fails in assigning the experimental observations to specific structural properties such as cell density, size, shape, or orientation. When attempting to solve this problem, we have chosen to disregard essentially all previous work in the field of diffusion MRI, and instead translate data acquisition and processing schemes from multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy [1]. Key elements of our approach are q-vector trajectories and correlations between isotropic and directional diffusion encoding. To highlight the source of the new methods, we have selected the name "Multidimensional diffusion MRI" [2]. Assuming that the water molecules within a voxel can be divided into groups exhibiting approximately Gaussian anisotropic diffusion, the composition of the voxel can be reported as a diffusion tensor distribution where each component of the distribution can be related to a specific tissue environment. Our new methods yield estimates of the complete diffusion tensor distribution or well-defined statistical properties thereof, such as the mean and variance of isotropic diffusivities, mean-square anisotropy, and orientational order parameter, which are straight-forwardly related to cell densities, shapes, and orientations. This presentation will give an overview of the multidimensional diffusion MRI methods, including basic physical principles, pulse sequences, data processing, and examples of applications in healthy and diseased brain.
VUIIS Friday Seminar Series, MRB III Lecture Hall (Room 1220)
Tuesday
19
December
2017
4:00pm
Delphine Chen, MD
Associate Professor, Dept of Radiology
Novel PET approaches for imaging lung inflammation
Friday
12
January
2018
1:00pm
Yi Wang, Ph.D.
Professor, Cornell University
TBA