Vanderbilt University
Institute of Imaging Science
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Friday
31
March
2017
1:00pm
Gianmarco Pinton, PhD
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill &
North Carolina State University
Ultrasound and nonlinear wave propagation in the human body   (more ...)
Ultrasound and nonlinear wave propagation in the human body   (hide ...)

The soft tissue of the human body supports both fast acoustic waves (1540 m/s) and slow shear waves (2 m/s). At large amplitudes these waves exhibit nonlinear behavior, such as harmonic development and shock formation. We have developed models and simulation tools that describe the physics of nonlinear acoustic propagation, attenuation, and scattering in highly realistic representations of the human body. We have used these models to develop new ultrasound imaging methods and to noninvasively treat brain tumors. We have also developed a new imaging high frame-rate (10,000 images/second) imaging technique that can directly and accurately image brain motion down to the micron level during traumatic brain injury. This study shows that shear shock waves are generated and propagate in the brain.
Friday
07
April
2017
1:00pm
Bruce Berkowitz, PhD
Wayne State University School of Medicine
co-sponsored: Vanderbilt Eye Institute and Vision Research Center
Oxidative Stress and its Functional Consequences Measured In Vivo by MRI   (more ...)
Oxidative Stress and its Functional Consequences Measured In Vivo by MRI   (hide ...)

In 1992, it was not obvious that MRI, a relatively insensitive and still developing imaging method, would be useful for examining the retina, one of the thinnest organs in the body. Since then, Dr. Berkowitz has established a body of work that highlights MRI as a surprisingly useful discovery tool in vision research. These methods have been successful transitioned into cancer and brain research areas, and are used by drug companies and other investigators world-wide. Improvements in resolution and methodology have even allowed us to measure the physiology of sub-compartments within rod cells in vivo. These data are spatially grounded based on optical coherence tomography images and compared to visual performance using optokinetic tracking. His current pioneering efforts uses MRI to measure neuronal oxidative stress without a contrast agent in untreatable neurodegenerative disease to optimize antioxidant treatment in vivo.
Friday
14
April
2017
1:00pm
Joseph Ackermann, PhD
William Greenleaf Eliot Professor
Professor, Dept. of Chemisty
Washington University in St. Louis
TBA
Tuesday
02
May
2017
4:00pm
Evan Brittain, MD, MSc
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
PET Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Metabolism in Pulmonary Hypertension
Friday
05
May
2017
1:00pm
Gordon Bernard, MD
Melinda Owen Bass Professor of Medicine
Associate Vice-Chancellor for Research
Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Science
Vanderbilt University
TBA
Wednesday
01
November
2017
4:00pm
Steve Townsend, PhD
Assistant Professor, Dept of Chemistry
Vanderbilt University
TBA