Vanderbilt University
Institute of Imaging Science
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Bruce Damon, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Molecular Physiology and Biophysics
Director of Graduate Studies, Chemical and Physical Biology Program

Contact Information

bruce.damon@vanderbilt.edu
(615) 322-8355

Interests

Our research interests lie in developing new imaging approaches for studying skeletal muscle function in vivo and implementing these approaches in applied physiology and clinical studies.

Projects

Muscle structure-function relationships: We are combining diffusion-tensor, spatial tagging, perfusion, and blood oxygenation-level dependent MRI to examine the responses of muscles to contractions, in an integrative fashion. We aim to contrast the findings from persons with Becker muscular dystrophy with those from healthy persons. Improved methods for quantifying muscle damage in vivo: In concert with co-PI Prof. Jane Park, we are developing more specific and quantitative imaging methods for characterizing muscle damage. The studies will be conducted in patients with inflammatory myopathies and in models of these diseases.

Publications

Elder CP, Cook RN, Chance MA, Copenhaver EA, Damon BM. (2010). Image-based calculation of perfusion and oxyhemoglobin saturation in skeletal muscle during submaximal isometric contractions. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 64:852-861.

Sanchez OA, Copenhaver EA, Elder CP, Damon BM. (2010). Absence of a significant extravascular contribution to the skeletal muscle BOLD effect at 3T. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 64:527-535.

Heemskerk AM, Sinha TK, Wilson KJ, Ding Z, Damon BM. (2010). Repeatability of DTI-based muscle fiber tracking. NMR in Biomedicine, 23:294-303.

Louie EA, Gochberg DF, Does MD, Damon BM. (2009). Transverse relaxation and magnetization transfer in skeletal muscle: Effect of pH. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 61:560-569.

Damon BM, Hornberger JL Wadington MC, Lansdown DA, Kent-Braun JA. (2007). Dual gradient-echo MRI of post-contraction changes in skeletal muscle blood volume and oxygenation. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 57:670-679.